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Thread: string tension...did i damage my uke ?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
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    15

    Default string tension...did i damage my uke ?

    Hi All,

    last night I decided to try a low g tuning on my kamaka. Not knowing that a low g is tuned to 196 MHz, I tuned it to a normal hi g tuning of 392 mhz. The string popped off the tuner, I realize now I had tuned it obviously to the wrong MHz due to inexperience and ignorance.. would this have damaged the neck? I have been nervous ,since it is a expensive kamaka.....

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Redmond, WA
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    501

    Default

    No damage except to the string and your nerves. That’s pretty much a rite of passage!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
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    Pacific Inland Empire
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    219

    Default

    I'd check it out under good lighting for damage before restringing. BTW, it's hz, Mhz is a million hertz.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tfdx View Post
    Hi All,

    last night I decided to try a low g tuning on my kamaka. Not knowing that a low g is tuned to 196 MHz, I tuned it to a normal hi g tuning of 392 mhz. The string popped off the tuner, I realize now I had tuned it obviously to the wrong MHz due to inexperience and ignorance.. would this have damaged the neck? I have been nervous ,since it is a expensive kamaka.....
    thanks for your replies!!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Sydney Australia
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Thanks for sharing, i have a low g set on the way and would no doubt have done exactly the same thing. I will check out my tuner today in preparation.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Sparta, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    2,093

    Default

    If your G-string sounds like it is getting higher in sound than your C-string as you are tuning, then you are headed towards a High-G. If it sounds lower as you tune, you are still in Low-G territory. Assuming your C-string is close to being in tune.

    Your ear will quickly alert you.

    And as Arcy indicated, almost all of us have done it at one time or another. Shouldn't have hurt your uke. Certainly not the integrity of the neck or top or bridge. At worst, you may have gotten a sting on your hand or arm and a small welt. (Yep, been there, done that. On my 8-string and on a Pono. Both tenors.)
    There is a subtle yet profound difference between the learning of something and the knowing of that thing.
    You can learn by reading, but you don’t begin to know until you begin to try to do.

    —Lou Churchill, Plane & Pilot Magazine

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    370

    Default

    Fretting low g string at fifth fret is same as 3rd string C.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Ames, Iowa
    Posts
    4,130

    Default

    Some tuners do not differentiate between octaves, even when on the ukulele specific setting. It happens to a lot of us. Don't worry about it.
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.

    I just want everyone to understand that I am not a ukulele expert, even though it may look at times like I'm pretending to be.

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...tective+Agency

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