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Thread: Shimming a saddle.

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    JoCo, NC (near Raleigh)
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    4,954

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    In my case, I had a bone saddle and I glued a strip of ebony to the bottom of it after sanding it down to the height I wanted. Worked like a charm to remove the buzz I was getting and had no negative effect on volume, pickup behavior, or anything else. I think I still have the rest of the strip that DocJ sent to me. I'd be happy to send it to you if you think you can use it.
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  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    MN metro area
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    1,671

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Hanks View Post
    In my case, I had a bone saddle and I glued a strip of ebony to the bottom of it after sanding it down to the height I wanted. Worked like a charm to remove the buzz I was getting and had no negative effect on volume, pickup behavior, or anything else. I think I still have the rest of the strip that DocJ sent to me. I'd be happy to send it to you if you think you can use it.
    Thanks for the offer! It's very thoughtful and helpful but I'll play around with what I find around the house.
    Money can't buy happiness but it can buy a uke which is basically the same thing.

    Ukes are a lot like potato chips. It's hard to stop with just one!

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    173

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    I got a bone saddle and shaped a shim from that. I just used a dremel.

    Jim your idea sounds like a great one as well.
    Soprano: Ohana SK-38 (Mahogany)
    Concert: Barron River (Curly Maple)
    Tenor: Pono PKT-2E (Koa) / Romero Creations Replica (Spruce/Acacia)

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Stormville NY
    Posts
    109

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    The taller the shim, the less of the original saddle will remain in the slot on the bridge. If not enough of the saddle is in the bridge, the saddle will slant twards the peg head when the strings are brought to proper tension. This will change the intonation, and it could also damage the bridge.

    So when you are finished with the shim, check how well the saddle fits in the bridge.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Catskill Mountains, NY
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    5,846

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    Quote Originally Posted by uke51 View Post
    The taller the shim, the less of the original saddle will remain in the slot on the bridge. If not enough of the saddle is in the bridge, the saddle will slant twards the peg head when the strings are brought to proper tension. This will change the intonation, and it could also damage the bridge.

    So when you are finished with the shim, check how well the saddle fits in the bridge.
    How about gluing the shim to the saddle?
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    MN metro area
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    1,671

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    Quote Originally Posted by uke51 View Post
    The taller the shim, the less of the original saddle will remain in the slot on the bridge. If not enough of the saddle is in the bridge, the saddle will slant twards the peg head when the strings are brought to proper tension. This will change the intonation, and it could also damage the bridge.

    So when you are finished with the shim, check how well the saddle fits in the bridge.
    Good point! I don't think it will be an issue. If an average credit card is .8 mm and the effect at the 12th fret is half that I think raising the action by .4 mm will work well for me so I'd be adding less than 1 mm at the bridge/saddle.

    I'm not even certain that I need to raise the action. I've been playing two of my ukes regularly and every now and then I'm getting a sound I can't put my finger on so to speak. (On both - both with low action) It sounds kind of like a clicking sound or maybe a slight buzz and I can't tell if it is just the way my nail is hitting the string or maybe a slight buzz or maybe it's the occasional result of sloppy chording by the fret hand. When I hear it I stop to try and recreate the sound but I can't. I notice it usually when I'm playing a faster/louder song with a lot of chord changes. I don't remember hearing the sound before so maybe it's the dry winter air changing the action ever so slightly. (both have an Oasis humidifier in the sound hole) I figured shimming the saddle would be an easy and easily reversible thing to try to see if it makes a difference.
    Money can't buy happiness but it can buy a uke which is basically the same thing.

    Ukes are a lot like potato chips. It's hard to stop with just one!

  7. #17

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    I avoid shimming.
    Usually it's better just to sand down a new saddle.

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