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Thread: Adapting a standard depth hard case for a thinline ukulele.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Default Adapting a standard depth hard case for a thinline ukulele.

    I had a Musician's Friend hard case which I needed to adapt so it would support and accommodate a thinline ukulele. My goal was to build up the padding on the bottom of the case so it would fit exactly.

    - I started by tracing the body of a ukulele (that fit the case) onto a solid piece of cardboard (i.e. no folds/creases) and cut it out to form a template.

    - I dry fit the cardboard template in the case and then used a scissors to trim the edges of the template to the point where it fit snugly and I didn't have to force it into place. (i.e. it didn't compress the padding on the sides)

    - I then used the template to trace the pattern onto a square of 1-inch craft foam rubber. I then used a serrated steak knife to cut the pattern out of the foam rubber which fit snugly and perfectly in the bottom of the case.

    - I didn't really want the ukulele sitting directly on the foam rubber and the foam rubber wasn't especially pretty on the edges where it was cut so I wanted to cover it with some kind of cloth. My first thought was to use flannel from an old shirt but instead I decided to use a plush microfiber cloth I bought at the Dollar Tree and was using to wipe down my ukes after using them.

    - I laid the microfiber cloth out flat and then placed my handy cardboard template on top of that. I then took a ruler, placed it on the edge of the template and measured out 1-1/4 inches and made a dot on the cloth with a felt tip marker. I then did the same thing about every 2 inches around the entire perimeter of the template. I then connected the dots to form a pattern on the microfiber cloth which was 1-1/4 inches wider than the template on all sides. I then cut out the pattern with a pair of scissors.

    - I centered the microfiber cloth on top of the foam in the bottom of the case and then simply tucked it in along all the edges. The edges of the foam fit snugly enough that it holds the cloth in place.

    It was easy to do and it turned out looking nicer than I thought it would!

    IMG_3089.jpgIMG_3090.jpgIMG_3091.jpg
    Money can't buy happiness but it can buy a uke which is basically the same thing.

    Ukes are a lot like potato chips. It's hard to stop with just one!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    USA
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    Default

    Nice. Looks like that works well.

  3. #3

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    Partially defeats the purpose of a slimline uke in my eyes, but each to their own.
    Good job!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
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    5

    Default

    Good idea. I recently purchased a thinline uke and was looking for a hard case for it that was smaller (thinner) in outside dimensions than my Crossrock tenor hard case. After much searching, the only one that I could find was a Kala Travel Tenor Ukulele Black Hardcase which sells on their site for $97.99. It is a sturdy case and about 1" thinner than the Crossrock but is actually LONGER! Go figure. Even then, the area for the fretboard/headstock is too large and I wound up cutting a foam insert to take up space under the headstock. I'll check out Dollar Tree for the material.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jolly_O View Post
    I'll check out Dollar Tree for the material.
    I found it in the auto section.
    Money can't buy happiness but it can buy a uke which is basically the same thing.

    Ukes are a lot like potato chips. It's hard to stop with just one!

  6. #6
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    Catskill Mountains, NY
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    Are you sure that isn't just a seat cushion from a Harley?
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by kissing View Post
    Partially defeats the purpose of a slimline uke in my eyes, but each to their own.
    Good job!
    Yes, a thinline uke is marketed as a "travel uke" which I always thought was kind of silly. If you are going to go to the trouble of traveling with a ukulele is that 1-inch and marginal difference in weight really going to make a difference? It seems like more of a gimmick to me. I didn't buy it for that reason. It will be traveling between my bedroom and the living room and will probably rarely, if ever, leave the house.

    The choice to adapt a standard case is one of convenience and economics. I wanted a hard case and they are difficult to find for a thinline uke. When/if you do find one, the cost is 3x(+) the cost of the case I adapted. (Based on the price found by Jolly O in post #4) It just seems to make much more sense to me to spend $3-$4 adapting a much more affordable, easy to find case.
    Last edited by mikelz777; 02-24-2020 at 04:00 AM.
    Money can't buy happiness but it can buy a uke which is basically the same thing.

    Ukes are a lot like potato chips. It's hard to stop with just one!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    MN metro area
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerryc41 View Post
    Are you sure that isn't just a seat cushion from a Harley?
    Ha! It does look like it could be a Harley seat cushion!
    Money can't buy happiness but it can buy a uke which is basically the same thing.

    Ukes are a lot like potato chips. It's hard to stop with just one!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Sparta, Wisconsin, USA
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    Uke Republic has a UkeKrazy Travel (Thinbody) Tenor Hard Case for $80.

    "Specifically designed to accommodate the Kala Thinbody Travel Tenor Ukulele."

    Nice job adapting a regular hard case to hold your thin tenor. Looks good too.
    Last edited by Kenn2018; 02-24-2020 at 08:57 AM.
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