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Thread: 2 concerns with No. 2 tenor build -size and kerfing glue job

  1. #1
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    Default 2 concerns with No. 2 tenor build -size and kerfing glue job

    It looks like the body naturally rests a good 1/4" short of the length of the template and the top. I can force it longer or just go with it -I'd split the difference and not try to go to full length. Opinions?

    The kerfing looks well glued in from the top but when I took clamps of and cleaned it up I find a lot of gaps. I used clothespins and sundry other clamps. I'm wondering about going to a different style of kerfing/lining? Should I take this apart or go with it as is?

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  2. #2
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    This is one of the reasons I tend not to use kerfed lining that has such a large/sharp angled portion like that (nothing against people that do use them). If you used titebond glue, you can try and use some high acidity (~30%) vinegar to soften the glue to the point where you can re-clamp. Personally, I'm a big fan of solid linings, but a lot of that depends on how much of it you route away for binding. With no binding, I usually use basswood, about an 1/8" thick and 1/4" wide. A big appeal of solid linings to me is you can always just laminate another layer on and then carve it down after its been glued to the sides.

  3. #3
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    Aloha Chuck, I would not bother to redo anything at this time, you are doing good for the second ukulele. The kerfing looks a bit oversized for a ukulele, making them a bit smaller would help. Also, wood clothes pins can be notched to better fit the kerfings and wrap them with rubber bands for additional clamping strength.
    Brad
    Bradford Donaldson
    Kekaha, HI and Cannon Beach OR
    bradfordj48@outlook.com

  4. #4
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    Just squeeze a little glue in from the bottom and they will be fine. On the length, don't worry too much, the uke will not know it. As long as you get the bridge in the right place.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam.R.B View Post
    This is one of the reasons I tend not to use kerfed lining that has such a large/sharp angled portion like that (nothing against people that do use them). If you used titebond glue, you can try and use some high acidity (~30%) vinegar to soften the glue to the point where you can re-clamp. Personally, I'm a big fan of solid linings, but a lot of that depends on how much of it you route away for binding. With no binding, I usually use basswood, about an 1/8" thick and 1/4" wide. A big appeal of solid linings to me is you can always just laminate another layer on and then carve it down after its been glued to the sides.
    Thanks for the great advice! Sounds like you've seen a few things! The vinegar thing sounds scary, I'd guess one would dribble some in/on at the gap points, give it time to work and then check by poking at the glue? My anxiety about putting vinegar on wood would need to be addressed by a bit of experimentation...
    Speaking of which, I may experiment with solid linings next go-round.
    "Why is it that you never have time to do it right the first time, but you always have time to do it right the second time??"

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by BuzzBD View Post
    Aloha Chuck, I would not bother to redo anything at this time, you are doing good for the second ukulele. The kerfing looks a bit oversized for a ukulele, making them a bit smaller would help. Also, wood clothes pins can be notched to better fit the kerfings and wrap them with rubber bands for additional clamping strength.
    Brad
    Brad, I got the dimensions for the kerfing watching Steve McLean's simple video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WrHvGavb1eI
    And in looking for that link, I discovered that I missed one by Ken Timms which I'll watch shortly!!
    "Why is it that you never have time to do it right the first time, but you always have time to do it right the second time??"

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by printer2 View Post
    Just squeeze a little glue in from the bottom and they will be fine. On the length, don't worry too much, the uke will not know it. As long as you get the bridge in the right place.
    Thanks for bringing me down to the planet again!
    "Why is it that you never have time to do it right the first time, but you always have time to do it right the second time??"

  8. #8
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    To me this is one of the pitfalls of making your own kerfed lining. I've never made any that I've been completely happy with, as it never is as consistent or accurate as the stuff I've bought. It doesn't bend enough (at times) in places, or it breaks. And clothespins alone really don't have enough power for this job.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brett S. View Post
    To me this is one of the pitfalls of making your own kerfed lining. I've never made any that I've been completely happy with, as it never is as consistent or accurate as the stuff I've bought. It doesn't bend enough (at times) in places, or it breaks. And clothespins alone really don't have enough power for this job.
    Thanks, Brett. I have similar concerns about the quality of the kerfing. The top kerfing which is what is pictured was done without the aid of a jig I made. The bottom kerfing is much nicer and more consistent. When I built my first instrument I felt that I should do as much as possible from scratch. That would give me a greater appreciation of what it is I was doing. I am pretty sure that I will cut some corners down the road.

    My clothes pin clamps were reinforced with rubber bands. I think that the issue is the shape of the jaw and how it matches the outside edge of the kerfing. Another option is to make kerfing that has no angle but is simply straight on either face and then reverse the smooth edge to the inside of the instrument. I think they call that reverse kerfing? I may mess around with that next build. :-)
    "Why is it that you never have time to do it right the first time, but you always have time to do it right the second time??"

  10. #10
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    Grestch did not use kerfing on their Sopranos. The one I have seems to hold up well, as have others I have seen.

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