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Thread: what a waste

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jardin View Post
    Well although I agree with all said here... as I tend to think of these things as I am re-sawing sanding and all that...I disagree to a certain extent.

    Waste is when you throw it all away willy nilly and do not use it.....However, if you put waste into a system that feeds on it....Like... feed it to worms or mulch a tree, compost it down, then it becomes food not waste....A dead tree on the forest floor is full of life and in the proper system nothing that breaks down and does not pollute the system is waste...It is food. Being that I am also an Organic Farmer I am just feeding the soil and the worms which in turn grows food....

    It still sucks but I dare say it is just as important to feed the soil as it is to make an instrument. At least it is a natural substance that is non-pollutive.

    Just another way to look at it anyway!
    All my sawdust is composted in 3 compost bins ..it takes about one year to turn the sawdust into rich soil that goes into my garden flower beds and veggie patch.
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  2. #12
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    Can you image how wastefully guilty that Michelangelo felt when, upon finishing the " Pieta' " he looked down and saw all that wasted marble ... :-)

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  3. #13

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    That's just a taste of what happens taking the tree through the sawmill. Every chainsaw cut is nearly 1\2" lost, every pass with the saw blade is nearly 3 \16 lost. If your equipment is not configured correctly, you get wavy cuts and more waste. Just getting true quartersawn lumber is significantly more waste than just sawing for grade. Every cut you take is sacrificing another cut, and I've literally lost sleep over how to cut very curly koa logs. If you are cutting for instrument stock, how thick you cut also can cause or save a lot of waste (orphan slices) Drying is another great opportunity to ruin and waste perfectly good wood. I've seen hundreds of board feet ruined by impatience and ineptitude. Probably the biggest waste is caused by nature herself (if you want to look at it that way). I can't remember how many times I've found massive koa logs just riddled with curl that were completely rotten.

  4. #14
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    If you for instance could saw to 2 mm instead of 4 mm there would be a lot won in less waste. If so, the time spent sanding and creating saw dust would be less too.
    But I donīt know what limits are necessary in your band saw.
    Assumably, as you saw to 4 mm itīs probably where you have a safe margin, isnīt it?
    Otherwise you would have made the plates 2 mm in the first place.
    Regards

  5. #15
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    I repaired an old island style soprano a while back and I noticed that the inside of the top and back plates were not sanded, just sawn finish...that would save a bit
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  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timbuck View Post
    I repaired an old island style soprano a while back and I noticed that the inside of the top and back plates were not sanded, just sawn finish...that would save a bit
    In the pre industrial sander days leaving the unexposed surfaces of woodwork unfinished with a plane or adze was common in cheaper timber buildings and furniture. It was known as half adzed work.
    A lot of people still use a slight corruption of that term for poor quality or lazy work practices.
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  7. #17
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    I donīt like the idea of leaving what is supposed to in some degree be a high quality instrument unsanded. I can understand that for an industrially built instrument in a big volume production. But not for something that aspires to be a quality product, i.e. hand built. If building directly from the sawn plate, without sanding, the surface will be more rough, thereby (my guess) a bigger surface taking up, but also leaving humidity faster as it changes. A sanded surface will be nicer to handle too.

  8. #18

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    It's hard for me to think in terms of "waste" when a block of wood is turned into multiple musical instruments.

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