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Thread: Use of sanitizer on ukuleles

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snargle View Post
    (I'm not talking about running your uke under the faucet!)
    So I guess the dishwasher is out of the question.
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerryc41 View Post
    So I guess the dishwasher is out of the question.
    I was thinking of the microwave, but I don't think any of my ukes will fit. Maybe if I had a sopranino?
    Larry

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  3. #13
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    Jul 2019
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    Hand sanitizers need to be at least 60% alcohol according to the WHO. 40% (80 proof) and 50% (100 proof) ethyl alcohol is the average of most whiskeys, which I'm pretty sure a little of it is better in me than on my ukuleles. If you have to play others' ukuleles don't touch your face and then afterwards wash or sanitize your hands asap.

    I'm more interested in products like Clorox Disinfectant Wipes - bleach free which claim to kill the A2 flu virus on most surfaces. For instance, if a cardboard package is delivered by FedEx and I watch the delivery person walk away coughing, can I wipe it down with the Wipes before opening/touching or should I wait 24 hours which is what one study says the virus can live on cardboard. Inquiring minds...

  4. #14
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    Jan 2020
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    When it comes to shops, it's normal for the people there to sanitize the ukes as many customers put their hands on them and could inevitably transmit the virus accidentally as many don't even have a clue if they're carriers at the moment. But yes, likely the solution can damage the finish, depending on the material used.
    With this outbreak, I'm starting to panic a bit. I keep a safe distance from the people in my house, we try to stay as safe as possible. My dad was on a flight a week and a half ago and that's where the paranoia started from, we're just keeping safe.
    I'm the only one who uses the ukes, so there's no reason to sanitize them, but I do wash my hands compulsively (and have a separate soap). But I feel this isn't enough, I'm going to get two soap dispensers cause it's the safest way to wash your hands, one for the sector of the house my parents live in, one for ours (the https://popular.reviews/best-automat...rnee_OP-SD0001 is what I settled on after 1-2 days of research, it's cheap but seems to do the job well, at least that's what other buyers say).
    It's best to keep safe these days, at least until this all blows over. And it's great to see that shop owners are conscious and do their best to prevent the spread.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard_R11 View Post
    ...I'm going to get two soap dispensers cause it's the safest way to wash your hands...And it's great to see that shop owners are conscious and do their best to prevent the spread.
    I've had 8 oz dispensers all around the house and in the car for years. I buy a pair of large jugs of the hand sanitizer and refill the little ones from them.

    As for the automatic dispensers, from what I've read and heard, reliability is not their strong suit. Touching the manual type isn't so bad because you sanitize your hands immediately after touching it.

    Lots of businesses are sending out emails about how they're taking special care to sanitize their stores. 'Taint necessarily so. I know people who work in stores, and the manager has regular employees "wiping down" areas when they're not busy. They're just hourly workers with no special training or enthusiasm for sanitizing.
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  6. #16
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    You might look into UV light sanitizers. I have one that is for phones and other small items, but they make wand versions as well.
    Or maybe put your uke in the sunlight (not through glass) for a natural sanitizing. Make sure the sun isn't too hot for the finish... keep an eye on it.

    –Lori

  7. #17
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    May 2013
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    NH
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    Playing ukulele outside in the sun works for me.
    Kamaka HF3, Tenor
    Martin S1, Soprano
    Ko'olau C1, Concert
    Flight TUS-35

  8. #18
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    This is a short, but very good article about why soap and water is more effective on Corona Viruses than santizers.

    Chemistry Professor Explains Why Soap & Water Works
    http://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/0...virus-hygiene/

    Quoted from a different article:
    Alcohol works — to a degree

    To sum up, viruses are almost like grease-nanoparticles. They can stay active for many hours on surfaces and then get picked up by touch. Then they get to our face and infect us because most of us touch our face frequently.

    Water is not effective alone in washing the virus off our hands. Alcohol-based products work better. But nothing beats soap — the virus detaches from the skin and falls apart readily in soapy water.


    From a friend that has a doctorate in biology and decades in Molecular Biology labs & research:

    So two structural types of animal viruses, with or without a lipid (fat) layer on the outside (there are many other internal differences between viruses, e. g. the nucleic acids and types of proteins, etc). I disagree with the term "most" having the lipid layer since not all viruses have been determined structurally. The without lipid layer, like hepatitis, are resistant to detergent and hand sanitizer effects because the primary action of these two is to disrupt the lipid layer and influence infectivity of the viruses containing the lipid layer. If the lipid virus have screwed up or missing lipid, it can't get in your cells then they are done. The ones without the lipid layer are not affected by the detergent and sanitizer (effective ingredient is usually 62-70% alcohol optimally for all pathogens (usually isopropanol) and remain infective for the most part. However, the hand washing with detergent serves primarily to get goop off your hands etc (and all organisms associated with the goop), and also interact with all cells that have lipid or fat in them including bacteria, fungi, single cell protozoans like malaria, and non cell lipid containing viruses (but not viruses lacking lipid).

    (Don't ask me to translate. ) "Goop" is a technical term.
    Last edited by Kenn2018; 03-19-2020 at 11:24 AM.
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  9. #19
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    Sep 2019
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    If we have to keep doing this for a long time, people are going to start getting UV disinfectant lights.

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