Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 15 of 15

Thread: WHat's Going on with my Koaloha?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Oahu Isle, Hawaii
    Posts
    478

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ukecaster View Post
    If you are used to low G, going to reentrant can sometimes make the uke sound thin and wimpy, at least until your ears get used to it.
    Totally agree!!!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Uk3player78 View Post
    What is the beater concert?
    Its a 23 year old R & L Hawaiian Ukulele. I got it when I went to Hawaii many years ago. Its Koa, but not sure how good it is. The only reason its a beater is because its lived a rough life between living on a Tallship for a few years, to many camping trips, and its had some repairs to fix some cracks and a bridge that is separating because it had a noun metal c string on it for the first few years of its life.

    The Koaloha used to be quite a bit louder than the concert.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    South Kohala, HI
    Posts
    154

    Default

    I switched from worth clears to oasis on my KO Aloha tenor and am getting more volume and more low-mid.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Ames, Iowa
    Posts
    4,161

    Default

    Could be it opened up. Instruments change over time and with use. Some sound better over time, but there is no laws of nature that says it can't go dull instead.
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.

    I just want everyone to understand that I am not a ukulele expert, even though it may look at times like I'm pretending to be.

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...tective+Agency

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Honolulu, HI
    Posts
    2,239

    Default

    That combo of high G Worth strings and a KoAloha tenor should be vibrant and loud.

    I had changed the strings on a Martin Soprano in the recent past and simultaneously sanded down the saddle for action. And after I did that, it sounded absolutely wimpy too--tinny, hollow, almost like a toy plastic uke. (To be fair, this was a laminate instrument...so not too far off from plastic...but still.) It was especially bad on the A string. I thought I had ruined the saddle by going too low, so I went and bought a replacement part. But then, I let the instrument sit for a few days on the wall, and suddenly, it "worked" again and sounded like you'd expect with that Martin soprano bark. Hopefully your KoAloha sounds good again after settling in by now.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •