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Thread: Changing strings

  1. #1

    Default Changing strings

    Like many other people I have a bit of spare time at the moment and thought I would see one of my instruments sounded like with different strings. I was given a set of Stagg strings by a friend a while ago and decided to try them on my Baton Rouge long necked soprano as the ones it came with seemed a bit squeaky at times. It is a while since I had changed nylon strings on a guitar but I had little problem fitting the new strings but they seemed to take a long time to settle down. After a period of 10 days the new strings still would not stay in tune is this unusual ? I know I may have not pulled the knots on the tie bar bridge tight enough but surely they should have settled down in that time. I was glad I still had a couple of instruments around that stayed in tune as I was finding it very annoying.I have now restrung the Baton Rouge with its old strings which seem settle down ok as they had been stretched before. I wondered what I had done wrong was my knot tying wrong or are the strings just inferior? They did seem a bit heavier gauge than the originals which may have been Aquilla even though there was no label on the uke when it was bought. The sound was pretty dire anyway and the original sound fault may have been my bad fretting. I was wondering if strings take that long to settle down.

  2. #2
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    Don't know anything about Stagg strings, are they nylon, or fluorocarbon? They do take a while to settle in., get some Living Water and make it worth your while...
    Just Play

    Sopranos: 1st uke, Lanikai soprano LU-11 - Aquilas | 30's Martin style 0 - Martins
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  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by UkerDanno View Post
    Don't know anything about Stagg strings, are they nylon, or fluorocarbon? They do take a while to settle in., get some Living Water and make it worth your while...
    They are nylon,made with US nylon to quote the box,I would have thought 10 days under tension would have been long enough to settle down. The looked a heavier gauge than the originals which have been put back on. I'm not an expert on ukelele strings but in the past changed quite a few nylon guitar strings with no trouble. Even when in tune the sound was not to my liking. I think it is time I sent off for some other brand, I was being a bit scrooge like using free strings. Thanks for answering

  4. #4
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    I seem to recall nylon strings take longer to settle in. Probably they settle in on the guitar due to higher tension?

    When I have fresh strings, for the first few days I’ll often tune my uke up half a step before I put it away. I’ll wait to see if someone else tells me it’s a bad idea before I recommend it, but I’ve had no issues.
    Glenn

  5. #5
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    There are three ways for strings to go out of tune, assuming the tuners aren't slipping. There is an attachment point at either end, and there is the actual stretching of the string itself. One trick someone told me about was sliding a pencil under the strings, running perpendicular to the fretboard.
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  6. #6
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    Jun 2018
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    I've had Fluorocarbon strings take two weeks or more to really settle down. Still have to tune them every day. Overnight they sometimes go flat, other times they've gone sharp, or a combination of the two. Mostly due to humidity and pressure changes I think. Since the indoor temps are pretty constant.

    Nylon strings on my banjo uke didn't take as long to settle. But they too require tuning everyday.
    There is a subtle yet profound difference between the learning of something and the knowing of that thing.
    You can learn by reading, but you don’t begin to know until you begin to try to do.

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  7. #7
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    Nylon strings can take a long time. You can accelerate by manually pulling the string up a bit and then tuning up again. Do this several times until the uke stays in tune for about half hour. Then repeat on next day and so forth.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by glennerd View Post
    ... for the first few days I’ll often tune my uke up half a step before I put it away. I’ll wait to see if someone else tells me it’s a bad idea before I recommend it, but I’ve had no issues.
    This is what I do with new strings, and I’ve seen it recommended in a few places. It’s worked well for me so far with no noticeable problems.

    Adam

  9. #9

    Default

    Thanks for the info folks as Glenn says maybe due to higher tension nylon guitar strings settle down quicker or maybe my knots were not tight enough to start with whatever I put the old strings back on temporarily as the sound was rubbish to me. The Stagg strings will be saved as they may suit the banjo uke.

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