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Thread: Calling all Self-Taughts

  1. #41
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    May 2015
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    South West Georgia
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    I am self taught in uke harmonica and mountain dulcimer. Never a lesson. But thank goodness for the internet and the many videos, and beginner books to buy. So, maybe I’m not self taught. I found forums like UU for different instruments invaluable. We’re not alone.

    I’m now teaching myself piano. With amazing help from the many you tube videos available. This is my 3rd attempt at piano, and so far so good. This shelter in place routine has helped.

    Self taught? Perhaps me thinks not, perhaps yeah. “Only da shadow know.”
    “Well, today is a good day to make music.”

  2. #42

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    The problem with being self taught is you stand the good chance of having an idiot for a teacher. I can say that being self taught for many instruments. Self taught is rewarding but admittedly the longest way around it. Most if not all technique flaws go unnoticed until well ingrained. Getting the most out of the time you have to invest can go wasted if you don't have an effective plan. In this age of online material it's doable but I advise having a trained eye check your progress from time to time.

    I find the most progress I achieve is in tiny goals. Learning one small thing new or perfecting some thing that I tend to stumble on. When I play alone I perform triage on my playing, taking care to notice bits that aren't up to the rest. Those bits become my tiny practice goals. You can fix almost anything small in 10-15 minutes of concentration. If you do this everyday you will be better today than you were yesterday and for me that's the big goal.

    Without tiny goals, practice becomes noddleing over tunes I know or am learning and weeks go by and I'm basically the same player I was before

    If you really want to "practice" and don't have a great plan, make it a practice each time you sit down with the instrument, to have at least one tiny goal that can be achieved in 10-15 minutes of hard focus. One tiny thing to perfect and then go about what you do normally. This works for me - as they say... 'your mileage may vary'
    Last edited by mwilson; 05-28-2020 at 04:22 PM.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
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    Pacific Inland Empire
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    I suppose I'm being taught by an idiot. Here's the thing though: if one has never been able to learn "conventionally" through handicap one has the privilege of DIY instruction
    No one's an idiot when they're doing better on their own. No one should look down on handicapped people who get the job done their way.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
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    SE Connecticut, USA
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    There’s no question that one-on-one instruction by a teacher is the fastest and most efficient way to learn how somebody else plays the ukulele.
    Sopranos: aNueNue Khaya Mahogany 1, Bruko No. 6; Kiwaya KS-1; Kiwaya KTS-4; Kiwaya KTS-4K; Martin S-O
    Concerts:Cahaya CY-0112; Kiwaya KTC-1; Kiwaya KPC-1M; Kiwaya KCU-1, Takumi TC-1M, Takumi TC-3K, Musicguymic’s Kolohe
    Tenors: Cordoba 24T; Kiwaya KTT-2K
    Baritones: Cordoba 24B

  5. #45
    Join Date
    May 2020
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    128

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    Quote Originally Posted by Swamp Yankee View Post
    There’s no question that one-on-one instruction by a teacher is the fastest and most efficient way to learn how somebody else plays the ukulele.
    So, if you learned from a video or book, you're not learning "the fastest and most efficient way to learn how somebody else plays the ukulele" but rather the slower and less efficient way to learn how somebody else plays ?

    I guess unless you go under a rock and learn the ukulele all by yourself ... re-emerging once you've perfected you unique way of playing, you are always going to learn how somebody else plays based on your thinking?

    Having had the experience of 1:1, group, and self-teach, I can say that live instruction is the quickest way to learn how to play an instrument. I'm not sure about whether 1:1 or group is best for ukulele, but live if definitely better than self-teach.

  6. #46
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    Aug 2017
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    SE Connecticut, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by clear View Post
    So, if you learned from a video or book, you're not learning "the fastest and most efficient way to learn how somebody else plays the ukulele" but rather the slower and less efficient way to learn how somebody else plays ?

    I guess unless you go under a rock and learn the ukulele all by yourself ... re-emerging once you've perfected you unique way of playing, you are always going to learn how somebody else plays based on your thinking?

    Having had the experience of 1:1, group, and self-teach, I can say that live instruction is the quickest way to learn how to play an instrument. I'm not sure about whether 1:1 or group is best for ukulele, but live if definitely better than self-teach.
    As I’ve already indicated earlier in this thread, the only thing I’ve learned about playing a ukulele from video was how to double strum. The only thing I have learned from printed sources about playing the ukulele is from chord diagrams. And, for the first few years of my uke playing, I didn’t even use chord diagrams... in fact, I noodled out quite a few original songs by ear without knowing which chords I was playing.

    I understand that instruction can be helpful, but from my own perspective, I have arrived at my own style through years of trial and error. And I’m very happy with the flexibility I’ve attained. I doubt that would have happened if I’d had a teacher telling me not to do this and not to do that. My question would always have been, why not?
    Sopranos: aNueNue Khaya Mahogany 1, Bruko No. 6; Kiwaya KS-1; Kiwaya KTS-4; Kiwaya KTS-4K; Martin S-O
    Concerts:Cahaya CY-0112; Kiwaya KTC-1; Kiwaya KPC-1M; Kiwaya KCU-1, Takumi TC-1M, Takumi TC-3K, Musicguymic’s Kolohe
    Tenors: Cordoba 24T; Kiwaya KTT-2K
    Baritones: Cordoba 24B

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Ames, Iowa
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    Being fast and efficient is not the way I'm wired. When I hear someone spouting off about the "fastest and most efficient way", I wonder where I need to get to so quickly and efficiently. You hurry on to wherever it is you're going, I'm doing just fine coasting along and enjoying the scenery thank you.
    Last edited by Rllink; 05-30-2020 at 10:40 AM.
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.

    I just want everyone to understand that I am not a ukulele expert, even though it may look at times like I'm pretending to be.

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...tective+Agency

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Capital District, New York
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    Going back and reading my first post in this topic, I need to explain what I mean by "self-taught" in respect to myself.

    I don't "read" notation, although I can tell you what a note is, based on where it sits on a treble staff. I can recognize a sharp and a flat, and know that no sharps or flats is the key of C, one sharp is G, two sharps is D, and one flat is F - I'll take a wild guess that two flats is Bb, but not gonna bet anything on it.

    I play by ear - always have. We had a chord organ when I was a kid, and if I knew the melody of a song, I could pick it out. If the book showed a chord name, I could find the correct button to push for the chord.

    When we got a guitar, I read the chord chart in the back, and memorized the patterns for many 1st position chords (I didn't know that was what they were called, just that they were the first ones shown, and generally the easiest.) There was a pitch pipe so I could tune it, and once it was tuned, I began to pick out melodies, all by ear. The same with a 5-string banjo.

    I'd say the same with a mountain dulcimer, but I had no idea how that thing was tuned; I could pluck out melodies, however.

    Uke has the same shapes as the 4 highest-pitched strings on a guitar, so the skill transferred easily. (You could say I'm not self-taught on ukulele, but I am self-taught on guitar.)

    Lessons work for some us, not so much for others.

    I have to agree with Swamp Yankee, though:

    Quote Originally Posted by Swamp Yankee View Post
    There’s no question that one-on-one instruction by a teacher is the fastest and most efficient way to learn how somebody else plays the ukulele.
    (Emphasis mine.)


    -Kurt
    Last edited by ksiegel; 05-30-2020 at 02:57 PM.
    Banjo Ukes: Southern Cross, Firefly, Stella
    Sopranos: Donaldson, Timms, Moku, Waterman, Bugsgear, Outdoor, Waverly Street, Harmony
    Concerts:Cocobolo #460 &#412, Ohana CK450QEL, CK-65D, Rosewood Vita, Mahogany Vita,
    Donaldson Custom, Epi Les Paul, National Triolian Reso, Republic
    Tenors: Kala KA-KTG-CY, KoAloha Sceptre, Fluke, Cordoba 20TM
    Bass: Fluke Timber

    Am I done?

    ...Maybe?...

    My YouTube Channel

  9. #49
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    Feb 2017
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    1,086

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    you guys are hilariously pugnacious and fight about anything.

  10. #50
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    Aug 2017
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    SE Connecticut, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by ripock View Post
    you guys are hilariously pugnacious and fight about anything.
    Balderdash!
    Sopranos: aNueNue Khaya Mahogany 1, Bruko No. 6; Kiwaya KS-1; Kiwaya KTS-4; Kiwaya KTS-4K; Martin S-O
    Concerts:Cahaya CY-0112; Kiwaya KTC-1; Kiwaya KPC-1M; Kiwaya KCU-1, Takumi TC-1M, Takumi TC-3K, Musicguymic’s Kolohe
    Tenors: Cordoba 24T; Kiwaya KTT-2K
    Baritones: Cordoba 24B

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