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Thread: Where to go next with my playing?

  1. #1
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    Default Where to go next with my playing?

    Hi all!

    I'm an experienced uke player, but most of my expertise comes from the world of other instruments - I am a seasoned bass player, folk guitarist and keyboardist, so have a lot of transferred knowledge. During my time playing uke I have covered a lot of areas, and as well as being confident in theory knowledge relating to the uke I am also competent with fingerpicking, lead lines, and more complex strumming techniques such as the split stroke or the triple.

    I would really appreciate some advice on where I can turn next to help to develop my playing, if anyone had some suggestions? Any recommendations of books or resources or areas to look at would be great. I'm really not fussy about what style of playing it involves, whether that be solo stuff, lead stuff or chordal things - I just wanna improve with some uke-specific things!

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
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    Have you done much transcription of 'ukulele performances you really enjoy? That might help guide you in a specific direction or reveal a technique you want to master.
    "Who hears music, feels his solitude Peopled at once -- for how count heart-beats plain / Unless a company, with hearts which beat, / Come close to the musician, seen or no?" - Robert Browning, "Balaustion's Adventure"

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    Quote Originally Posted by bacchettadavid View Post
    Have you done much transcription of 'ukulele performances you really enjoy? That might help guide you in a specific direction or reveal a technique you want to master.
    Hi Yeah, I'm quite an active transcriber, not only in the realm of ukulele but other musical areas (especially vocal and choral music). Sadly it doesn't seem to lead to any playing inspiration for me - my transcriptions are almost always purely practical (for the sake of a lesson i'm tutoring or for me to learn a piece for a gig) - right now I'm not sure which music to even turn to in order to develop my playing in the first place.

  4. #4
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    What sorts of music do you most enjoy?
    "Who hears music, feels his solitude Peopled at once -- for how count heart-beats plain / Unless a company, with hearts which beat, / Come close to the musician, seen or no?" - Robert Browning, "Balaustion's Adventure"

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bacchettadavid View Post
    What sorts of music do you most enjoy?
    Now that's a big question for me, haha! I'm someone with a very eclectic taste, and I go through listening and playing 'phases' like many multi-instrumentalists do. When narrowed to the uke I really enjoy the intricate stuff that Jake Shimabukuro does, but I'm also a huge fan of folk music. My plan for the uke is to gig more when I can, not only accompanying singing but using loopers and effects pedals to layer techniques, very much like Shimabukuro too I guess.

  6. #6
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    Take a look at this for something very different:

    https://forum.ukuleleunderground.com...ead.php?101521
    "Who hears music, feels his solitude Peopled at once -- for how count heart-beats plain / Unless a company, with hearts which beat, / Come close to the musician, seen or no?" - Robert Browning, "Balaustion's Adventure"

  7. #7
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    I'd also recommend that you check out "Ukulele Aerobics", perhaps try your hand at some of Jake Shimabukuro's arrangements (most of them aren't terribly difficult although playing them as smoothly as Jake will take a while)...if you're up for a challenge, try your hand at some of Byron Yasui's stuff.

    EDIT: Also check out Benny Chong if you want a challenge.
    Last edited by bacchettadavid; 05-23-2020 at 03:19 PM.
    "Who hears music, feels his solitude Peopled at once -- for how count heart-beats plain / Unless a company, with hearts which beat, / Come close to the musician, seen or no?" - Robert Browning, "Balaustion's Adventure"

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill1 View Post
    The first thing is to get out of your house and start working with other people in some way. Not performing for them, working with them.
    Could you expand on that in some way please? While, s you'd understand, i'm trapped in at the moment, I am an active ensemble musician, I play and sing witb a range of groups, and I'm also a music tutor and collaborative arranger.

    I don't currently play in a uke group at all, so if thatd be beneficial I'd love to explore it. I'm just not sure as to what exactly your comment was pointing to?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by bacchettadavid View Post
    I'd also recommend that you check out "Ukulele Aerobics", perhaps try your hand at some of Jake Shimabukuro's arrangements (most of them aren't terribly difficult although playing them as smoothly as Jake will take a while)...if you're up for a challenge, try your hand at some of Byron Yasui's stuff.
    Great, thanks for the advice! I've learnt a small amount of ukulele weeps, and tried my hand at Jake's Bo Rhap, but as you say it is one hell of a challenge to get things anywhere near as smooth as him.

    I'll also check out those kalimba arrangements, something really different!!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonners98 View Post
    I've learnt a small amount of ukulele weeps, and tried my hand at Jake's Bo Rhap, but as you say it is one hell of a challenge to get things anywhere near as smooth as him.
    Check this out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BO4qESxhuAI

    It might be fun to learn some of the techniques that Jake begins to show off around 2:30 mark. Really slick stuff.
    "Who hears music, feels his solitude Peopled at once -- for how count heart-beats plain / Unless a company, with hearts which beat, / Come close to the musician, seen or no?" - Robert Browning, "Balaustion's Adventure"

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