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Thread: Spool Clamps, Glue, and Stain

  1. #1
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    Default Spool Clamps, Glue, and Stain

    1. From my experience, if glue seeps out of a joint and gets into the wood, the wood does not accept stain. What's the solution?

    2. Spool clamps are commonly used to hold parts of a uke together for gluing. Wouldn't square blocks be more efficient than round ones - more surface area?

    Spool Clamps.jpg
    Last edited by Jerryc41; 06-06-2020 at 11:48 PM.
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
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  2. #2
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    1. Yes, you are absolutely right about glue seepage onto bare wood. It can mar an otherwise perfect join and there isn't much you can do about it. What you can do is prevent it from happening in the first place. Don't use so much glue and don't smear the squeeze out. Wait a little bit until it starts to set and then use a sharp chisel to remove it. Some let the glue start to set before joining and then clean up, but I feel this can decrease the effectiveness of the glue. Also create barriers by using masking tape or a coat the wood with a thin layer of shellac (shellac is your friend!).

    2. Sure. But it is so easy to just use big dowels to make them. And do not buy them!

    stewmac-spool-clamps-set-of-6.jpg

    Way overpriced. $42 bucks for 6. Ridiculous.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by sequoia View Post
    1. Yes, you are absolutely right about glue seepage onto bare wood. It can mar an otherwise perfect join and there isn't much you can do about it. What you can do is prevent it from happening in the first place. Don't use so much glue and don't smear the squeeze out. Wait a little bit until it starts to set and then use a sharp chisel to remove it. Some let the glue start to set before joining and then clean up, but I feel this can decrease the effectiveness of the glue. Also create barriers by using masking tape or a coat the wood with a thin layer of shellac (shellac is your friend!).

    2. Sure. But it is so easy to just use big dowels to make them. And do not buy them!

    stewmac-spool-clamps-set-of-6.jpg

    Way overpriced. $42 bucks for 6. Ridiculous.
    So many articles talk about having equal glue squeeze-out to make sure the glue is applied evenly. I guess it's a balancing act between too much glue and just enough.

    I don't have a real need for those clamps, but if I did, I'd make them. I suspect I could make one for less than $7.00.
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  4. #4
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    so easy to just use big dowels to make them
    I made dozens out of scrap wood by using a hole saw (maybe 40mm) to cut the end circles, threaded rod and wingnuts to tighten. Cost of $1.50(?) each.
    Miguel

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    Quote Originally Posted by lauburu View Post
    I made dozens out of scrap wood by using a hole saw (maybe 40mm) to cut the end circles, threaded rod and wingnuts to tighten. Cost of $1.50(?) each.
    Miguel
    That sounds like the way to go. How long did you make the threaded rods?
    Last edited by Jerryc41; 06-07-2020 at 10:47 AM.
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerryc41 View Post
    1. From my experience, if glue seeps out of a joint and gets into the wood, the wood does not accept stain. What's the solution?

    2. Spool clamps are commonly used to hold parts of a uke together for gluing. Wouldn't square blocks be more efficient than round ones - more surface area?

    Spool Clamps.jpg
    The square ones are exactly the ones I made, they worked better than my round ones.
    Kind Regards
    Dennis

    dponeil@xtra.co.nz
    Southern Cross Banjo Ukes & Ukuleles
    Proudly Hand Crafted in
    New Zealand.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DPO View Post
    The square ones are exactly the ones I made, they worked better than my round ones.
    Would a 10-32 threaded rod be thick enough? I see them and wing nuts on Amazon. The 1/4-20 rods are getting into the price range that I would be hard to justify, considering the limited use I would have for them. How long are those rods?
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerryc41 View Post
    Would a 10-32 threaded rod be thick enough? I see them and wing nuts on Amazon. The 1/4-20 rods are getting into the price range that I would be hard to justify, considering the limited use I would have for them. How long are those rods?
    Yes, it will work fine. I made mine about six inches long, but really you only need them about an inch more than the widest uke body you're ever likey to build. I bought a threaded rod in 1mtr lengths, then cut to length.
    Kind Regards
    Dennis

    dponeil@xtra.co.nz
    Southern Cross Banjo Ukes & Ukuleles
    Proudly Hand Crafted in
    New Zealand.

  9. #9
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    I used 6mm threaded rod (that's 1/4" in old fashioned measurements) and about 200mm (8") long. I was making guitars at the time. As suggested above they only need to be as long as you need them.
    If your uke is about 80mm at the tail block, add 2 * 3mm (max) for the thickness of the top and back, add 2 * 18mm for the top and bottom blocks and 2 * 6mm for the wing nuts. Total 134mm (5.275") If you line the inside surfaces of the blocks with cork or leather you'll have to add those dimensions as well. Dennis' clamps would be about right at 6" (150mm)
    Miguel

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