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Thread: Tuning Fork, A or E and how to use ?

  1. #21
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    I really think that tuning with the fork was very good for my ear .
    " Anything larger than a soprano is cheating "
    " I'm no luthier but ,........"

  2. #22
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    May 2010
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    Somewhere I have 3 tuning forks, one pitched at A, one at E and I can't remember what the other one is. I think E saw the most use as I was playing guitar. Then there was my old set of pitch pipes. They've long gone because I haven't seen them for well over 20 years! I rather liked my pitch pipes. I was better at playing the pitch pipes than I was playing any plucked instrument that's for sure.

  3. #23

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    I just found out from this Wikipedia page that the pitch can be adjusted by removing material from the appropriate area. Filing the ends of the forks shortens them, raising the pitch. Deepening the throat lengthens the forks, lowering the pitch.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuning_fork

    I have a tuning fork from Germany from the turn of the twentieth century which belonged to my grandfather. Its handle is fancy-a tapered octagon topped by a ball with a round collar It is tuned A445, so useless for tuning in an A440 world. I've kept it in my uke case mainly as a joke. When someone asks to borrow a tuner I pull out the fork and watch their reaction. Now I know I can make it usable with a file and my Snark red tuner which has a pitch calibration feature. I wonder how the calibration was performed when the tuning fork was made over 100 years ago.

  4. #24
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    Leave the tuning fork as is. It's possible or even likely that it was made for 445 Hz. 440Hz wasn't really a standardised pitch until the 1940's or 50's and historically pitch has been all over the place - as evidenced by fixed pitch instruments such as church organs and wind instruments.
    As for calibrating it. It would have been a very simple task to calibrate, the technology of the time was a universe or two ahead of matching something to a specific pitch. In fact I doubt that they would have much of a problem doing it 2,000 years ago.
    Last edited by Michael N.; 08-24-2020 at 01:11 AM.

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