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Thread: Kanilea pins

  1. #11
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    Kanile'a pins are plastic. I do not understand why they would put these on a premium quality instrument. I changed out the pins on my GL-6 to bone after the one of the original pins snapped in two and the pieces flew across the room.
    Last edited by warndt; 08-02-2020 at 05:46 AM.

  2. #12
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    Aug 2012
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    Arizona
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    I like bridge pins, so easy to change strings. Cleaner look, no stress on bridge, a small bead on the end helps a lot. Tie bridges are my least favorite, hardest to get a clean look.
    Just Play

    Sopranos: 1st uke, Lanikai soprano LU-11 - Aquilas | 30's Martin style 0 - Martins
    Concerts: Kanile'a K-2 CP - Living Water | Islander AC-4 - Living Water | Waverly Street banjolele - Worth Browns
    Tenor: Martin Iz - Living Water low G
    UBass: Kala FS2 (fretless) - Pahoehoe | Kala Acacia - Pahoehoe

  3. #13
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    Aug 2019
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    I prefer pins on guitars (as well as sealed geared tuners), and anything but pins on ukuleles (and back of the head tuners). Just for aesthetic reasons; it's not something I try to recommend to others. So far the only advantage for me is that it (usually) keeps Kanile'a off of my UAS radar.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by warndt View Post
    Kanile'a pins are plastic. I do not understand why they would cheaply do this on a premium quality instrument. I changed out the pins on my GL-6 to bone after the one of the original pins snapped in two and the pieces flew across the room.
    Hmm, I wonder if they went back and forth this? My 2019 GL6 came with ebony bridge pins. It's a so-called "premium premium" model so maybe they use different pins on the various trim levels.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by gochugogi View Post
    Hmm, I wonder if they went back and forth this? My 2019 GL6 came with ebony bridge pins. It's a so-called "premium premium" model so maybe they use different pins on the various trim levels.
    No matter...If you are spending $1500+ for an instrument, utilizing plastic bridge pins is going cheap. I let Kanile'a know about the flying pin and they sent me a baggy of more plastic pins. Other than that...I love the instrument and their product. You are right though, mine is an older 2011 version of the K-1 GL-6, so they may have since changed their pins to a different type of material.
    Last edited by warndt; 08-02-2020 at 08:36 PM.

  6. #16
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    Feb 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by warndt View Post
    Kanile'a pins are plastic. I do not understand why they would cheaply do this on a premium quality instrument. I changed out the pins on my GL-6 to bone after the one of the original pins snapped in two and the pieces flew across the room.
    Upgrading them to ebony pins with MOP dots is a very worthwhile upgrade for just ~$20. I think they fit a bit worse than the plastic pins, but they look oh so much better. I suspect the plastic is more stable than the ebony pins, but since the ebony pins come in a set of 6 (for guitar), it's an easy upgrade to pick the best-fitting 4 of the lot.

  7. #17
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    Jun 2018
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    Kanile'a have an excellent video on changing the strings on their bridge pin ukes. In fact they are a sort of hybrid of a slot and pin. There is a small slot that the pin pushes the string into. And holds the string in place. When you remove the string, you use the pin to push the string out of the slot so you can pull the end up and out of the hole.

    My Living Waters A-string would pull out on my used K-1T no matter how big I tied the knot. The slot had worn a little and opened up a bit. So, I used a metal bead ($1.25 for 50 at Walmart) on the end and never had a pull out after that.

    I believe Kanile'a have ebony pins on their higher level models and the black plastic on their base models.

    I asked them about the use of plastic tuner knobs on their tenors and the reply was that the plastic knobs don't break like wooden ones tend to do with heavy use. They found out the hard way about wooden knobs break during a performance. (I still think they could at least remove the mold seam.)
    Last edited by Kenn2018; 08-02-2020 at 07:25 PM.
    There is a subtle yet profound difference between the learning of something and the knowing of that thing.
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  8. #18
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    Feb 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kenn2018 View Post
    Kanile'a have an excellent video on changing the strings on their bridge pin ukes. In fact they are a sort of hybrid of a slot and pin. There is a small slot that the pin pushes the string into. And holds the string in place. When you remove the string, you use the pin to push the string out of the slot so you can pull the end up and out of the hole.

    My Living Waters A-string would pull out on my used K-1T no matter how big I tied the knot. The slot had worn a little and opened up a bit. So, I used a metal bead ($1.25 for 50 at Walmart) on the end and never had a pull out after that.

    I believe Kanile'a have ebony pins on their higher level models and the black plastic on their base models.

    I asked them about the use of plastic tuner knobs on their tenors and the reply was that the plastic knobs don't break like wooden ones tend to do with heavy use. They found out the hard way about wooden knobs break during a performance. (I still think they could at least remove the mold seam.)
    I used to own a set of heads with actual mother pearl tuning buttons. One little bump on a mic stand and a knob split in two and disappeared into the mists. My wood knobs were a lot more durable but they tend to wear on the staff and develop play/looseness until they just spin. But, yeah, quality plastic buttons seem to last forever.

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