Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20

Thread: What type of wood could that be?

  1. #1

    Default What type of wood could that be?

    I wondern what type of wood this ukulele is made of.

    Its probably not acacia, cause its a "Bruko" and i never seen them use this wood.

    The back is Mahogany and looks very different.

    Maybe "flamed mahogany or cedar?

    Attachment 128767Any idea?
    Attachment 128768

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Los Angeles, near the Beverly Center.
    Posts
    5,431

    Default

    Links will not work for me. Did you use the insert image icon above the text box?




    This is Michael Kohan in Los Angeles, Beverly Grove near the Beverly Center
    9 tenor cutaway ukes, 4 acoustic bass ukes, 12 solid body bass ukes, 14 mini electric bass guitars (Total: 39)

    • Donate to The Ukulele Kids Club, they provide ukuleles to children in hospital music therapy programs. www.theukc.org
    • Member The CC Strummers: YouTube: www.youtube.com/user/CCStrummers/video, Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheCCStrummers

  3. #3

    Default

    Yes, i used that icon. Hmm... Here i try again:

    s-l1600.jpg
    s-l1600 (1).jpg

    Another wood that it could be is "Gabun" or "Ovangkol".
    Well or just any other wood growing in europe :-)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    West Philly, PA
    Posts
    562

    Default

    Spruce top with mahogany back and sides. Spruce darkens some as it ages which is why it has that coloring. Spruce can also have figure like that. Like this guitar. https://images.app.goo.gl/cGeYCvCpVq1MGzAN6
    Last edited by CPG; 08-08-2020 at 12:40 PM.
    Pohaku "Yellow Label" Mahogany Soprano
    Weymann Model 10 Mahogany Soprano (c. 1918)
    Uke.S.A. Hawaii (by "Pops KoAloha") Bearclaw AO Soprano

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    144

    Default

    If you look at their website and compare, it looks like cherry wood

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    So. Oregon
    Posts
    1,810

    Default

    The back looks most like khaya or sapele, both of which sometimes get scooped up into the more general name of "ribbon grain mahogany," though neither is a true mahogany. It doesn't look much like Honduran mahogany but that's not a big deal as both khaya and sapele can be very good both tonally and structurally.
    Last edited by saltytri; 08-08-2020 at 01:39 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    West Philly, PA
    Posts
    562

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by saltytri View Post
    The back looks most like khaya or sapele, both of which sometimes get scooped up into the more general name of "ribbon grain mahogany," though neither is a true mahogany. It doesn't look much like Honduran mahogany.
    I was actually thinking that too and almost went back and changed my original reply. Honduran mahogany doesn't usually have that striping.

    For others reference here is a photo of the mahogany top of my taylor 324.

    20200808_194047.jpg

    Note the even color all the way across.

    And here is a photo of the back which along with the sides is made of sapele.

    20200808_194105.jpg

    Note the striping.

    The overwhelming majority of the time if a uke or guitar has a different wood for the top than back/sides the top will be a softwood (e.g. spruce or cedar) and the back/sides will be a hardwood (e.g. mahogany, rosewood, maple, walnut, etc). When there are two different woods and both are hardwoods its usually to control costs and/or use a more sustainable species on the back and sides. My taylor 324 pictured above is an example of this as are the Kanile'a Oha series ukes with their koa tops and mahogany backs and side (in this case mahogany being less expensive than Koa keeps the cost down). Cherry and ovankal are both woods that are generally used to substitute for more expensive and/or less sustainable woods and so it is unlikely that they woud be used just as a top woods. None of this is too say that these less expensive woods are objectively not as good, they just tend to be used for the reasons mentioned.
    Last edited by CPG; 08-08-2020 at 04:03 PM.
    Pohaku "Yellow Label" Mahogany Soprano
    Weymann Model 10 Mahogany Soprano (c. 1918)
    Uke.S.A. Hawaii (by "Pops KoAloha") Bearclaw AO Soprano

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    414

    Default

    They have some mahogany/cedar instruments in their website right now. If we can forgive the sapele back as mahogany, I'd guess that top was cedar before I guessed spruce.

    That said it's a big hard to really see the top in that pic, at least for me. Maybe a few close up in focus photos could settle this.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Catskill Mountains, NY
    Posts
    7,988

    Default

    "Invalid attachment"
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Los Angeles, near the Beverly Center.
    Posts
    5,431

    Default

    I saw a photo of sapele the other day, which said that it's similar to mahogany but has a more striped look, so I'm pretty sure the body is sapele. I'm not sure about the top, could be cedar, but it seems to have more figuring in the grain than I've seen before.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •