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Thread: Thinking about making

  1. #1

    Default Thinking about making

    Hi

    I

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Stockton on Tees..North East UK.
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    5,465

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Graham Britton View Post
    Hi

    I
    Come on man out with it ...don’t be shy
    http://ukulele-innovation.tripod.com ebay i/d squarepeg_3000 Email timmsken@hotmail.com

    If you can believe that moving images and sound, can fly through empty space across the universe and be seen and heard on a box in your living room ?.. then you can believe in anything.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Mangawhai NZ
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    489

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    Graham
    Your life will be far less complicated if you stop at this point. Once started on this slippery slope you will never recover. Your spare time will vanish; home maintenance will be put on the back burner; any spare income will be sucked into the black hole of more wood and new tools and you will seriously contemplate giving up a perfectly good job to become an impoverished luthier.

    However, if you want to become a much more interesting person and make a truckload of interesting online friends, stop thinking and start making.
    Miguel

  4. #4

    Default

    I don’t know what went wrong there. What I was going t say is....

    I have some tools machinery and experience of working wood; fine furniture making. So I should have transferable skills. My question is can anyone recommend any decent books, plans on Uke building or guitar making. Initially I would be most interested in tenor and concert size.

    My second question is any thickness sander recommendations? I am in Uk, Manchester don’t hold that against me. I notice that jet do some relatively inexpensive machines. Ie 10-20 and 16-32. I know these are open ended so you can get twice the belt width, but never sure how effective these are if sanding in say 50% sections and tenor width in a single pass would be no doubt on the limit of a 10 inch machine.

    Finally any suggestions regarding good source of suitable timbers in UK?

    Any help would be much appreciated

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    201

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    Welcome to the addiction. One day you start "thinking" about making, you may never stop. Instead, you wake up in the middle of the night one day and realize you CAN'T stop thinking about it! Actually making ukuleles hasn't gotten me to stop thinking about it!

    There have been a couple good threads lately on similar topics:

    https://forum.ukuleleunderground.com...ok-Illustrated

    I don't own any uke-specific books but I can comment that the Cumpiano and Natelson guitar book is a personal favorite. It manages to be both thorough and practical at the same time.


    https://forum.ukuleleunderground.com...build-that-way

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Stockport, Cheshire.
    Posts
    433

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    Graham,
    I'm in the same neck of the woods(no pun intended). I started by downloading the Stewmac tenor uke diagram as a pdf file. It's not a full plan, but it's a start and it's free. then I watched as many Youtube videos as I could. There is a series of instructional videos by Mya Moe Ukuleles which are very good and you will learn a lot from these. I think the company have packed in, but maybe the videos are still there, I don't know.
    As for woods, you could start down the road at Tonetech, Stockport. Bill and Danny there are very helpful. Other places to try are Touchstone Tonewoods and David Dyke. Ebay is another source. Pete Howlett (member)also sells Uke sets occasionally so it might be worth a phonecall or a message over the forum.
    best of luck Mike
    I forgot to add that I had the 10-20 sander but moved over to a 16-32 when I started making guitars( and also there was a special offer on it at the time from Axminster Tools, Warrington)
    The 16-32 is a much better and more powerful machine although the 10-20 is good enough if it meets your needs, but just be aware that you may, as I did, graduate to larger instruments in time.
    Last edited by mikeyb2; 09-03-2020 at 06:39 AM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sheffield, England
    Posts
    131

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    I wouldn't bother with a thickness sander until you are 100% sure you want to make lots of ukuleles. They cost a lot, and there are lots of Luthier specific tools that you will need, much higher up the essentials list than a thickness sander (think fretting tools, binding tools, finishing supplies etc). You could always get a stewmac safe-t-planer for thicknessing, they work just fine.

    David dyke, Keystone Tonewood and Timberline exotic hardwood can usually supply uke specific sizes Tonewood. Across the channel Maderas Barber and Espen Tonewoods can also.

    If you want some back and sides, top and neck wood for a first build (don't spend lots, the first instrument is unlikely to be the finished article) then I have a reasonable stock of tonewood so can probably send something to you (assuming I have what you want) if that seems easier. I'm only across at Sheffield.
    Last edited by Red Cliff; 09-03-2020 at 12:07 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Wales, UK
    Posts
    5,374

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    Give me a call. Sign up to my FaceBook group (below). Unless you have 'constant' use for a thicknesser spend your money on other tools. I have some ideas. I also have uke specific tonewoods and hardware, and I employ a cabinet maker who is transfering his skills. I probably have the answers for you. I also live in the UK - admittedly the colonies (Wales)

    You will get a lot of good US advice here and will look with envy on their tool and wood choices. I've navigated these waters a long time and along with the other British builders who post here, would love to help you get your start in making.
    Last edited by Pete Howlett; 09-03-2020 at 02:06 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Maine, USA
    Posts
    25

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    Regarding you thickness sander question, I purchased a Supermax 19-38 sander a few years back and it has become the second most used power tool in my shop for a variety of wood working projects, including luthiery (my bandsaw is first). I was wary about the open ended design, but I have never seen an issue with it. It allows me to sand larger panels such as small table tops. My dust collector is attached to the top and I never detect any stray dust from it. I don't disagree with the above advice; for the money there are a lot of other tools you could purchase to get you going in ukulele building. But if you've got the funds to burn on your hobby, I would go for it. I've never used the Jet sanders, but they look similar.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    201

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    Graham - what machinery do you already own? I agree with the others that a thickness sander isn't high on the list for most people, but if you've already got the other major power tools for instrument building (I'd say: bandsaw, router(s), table saw, drill press in that order) then why not? They're certainly nice to have.

    I used to do all my thickness sanding at a buddy's house, he was well off enough to have a stupidly big and powerful dual-drum sander that was practically the size of a small car. He moved out of the area recently and I'm feeling the loss. My last few instruments I've improvised and it has been frustrating. I'm on the verge of buying the Jet 10-20 you mentioned. I've never used one but it seems like the perfect size for instrument work (not too big - important in a small shop space) and I've seen others on here mention liking them in recent threads.

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