Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Guitar gathering dust.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    15

    Default Guitar gathering dust.

    I took up playing Ukulele 10 years ago with my first tenor. Up until then I had noodled away on a nylon acoustic for years. Initially, I played the guitar more than the Uke but adding a soprano or two over the last few years has changed everything. The ukulele playing addiction began. Not only playing but I am studying the theory side of things more than I ever did on the guitar.

    I am still trying to work out why, for some (many of us here I guess) the Ukulele has become a more engaging instrument than the guitar. Occasionally, I pick up the guitar and play but not for long.

    Have any former guitarists here abandoned/partially abandoned their former instrument in a similar way to focus on the Ukulele?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    409

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Calbrit View Post
    I am still trying to work out why, for some (many of us here I guess) the Ukulele has become a more engaging instrument than the guitar. Occasionally, I pick up the guitar and play but not for long.

    Have any former guitarists here abandoned/partially abandoned their former instrument in a similar way to focus on the Ukulele?
    Slightly different: my guitar sat unused for a number of years, and at first playing the ukulele did nothing to change that. But eventually, interest in the ukulele rekindled my interest in guitar. And probably like many others, I think a side effect of Covid-19 is more time spent playing musical instruments.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Los Angeles, near the Beverly Center.
    Posts
    5,198

    Default

    I played guitar for almost fifty years, inspired by the Beatles and the British Invasion in the mid-sixties. I started in 1965 when I was fifteen, took a handful of lessons, then played with my friends for years, who were also influenced in the same way. I was reasonably good, and at a point, even influenced my nephew (my identical twin brother's younger son). My nephew became a very accomplished guitar player and is now composing music for TV, commercials and films.

    I bring that up because over seven years ago I bought a ukulele that looked like my Fender Telecaster guitar to use as a wall hanger. About two weeks later I received a postcard from the Los Angeles Music Center for their summer play-along series, which I attended before on guitar, but this time it was for ukulele. Hey, I thought, I have a ukulele, so I signed up for the three Saturdays of 6 hour sessions. After the first hour of the first session, I was hooked.

    With my guitar experience, I slipped right into the uke and joined two groups, having just retired and knew I needed to find something to keep myself occupied. A year later I added bass uke when the leader of one group asked if anyone like to take it up. Between both, I never touched my guitars again and gave all four to my nephew.


    This is Michael Kohan in Los Angeles, Beverly Grove near the Beverly Center
    9 tenor cutaway ukes, 4 acoustic bass ukes, 12 solid body bass ukes, 14 mini electric bass guitars (Total: 39)

    • Donate to The Ukulele Kids Club, they provide ukuleles to children in hospital music therapy programs. www.theukc.org
    • Member The CC Strummers: YouTube: www.youtube.com/user/CCStrummers/video, Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheCCStrummers
    Last edited by kohanmike; 09-13-2020 at 09:18 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    438

    Default

    It's a circle for me, and the ukulele made the link up.

    I once quit guitars; then picked up ukulele; and now, I plan to get back to guitars (in addition to ukuleles). I'm even thinking about classical guitars (which I used to think I'll never, ever, never, ever, never, ever, never, ever want to get involved.. because I've seen some scary finger nails).

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Posts
    28

    Default

    I played guitar for 40 years including an 8 year stint in a working band and have now sold everything guitar related and fallen under the ukulele spell. For starters, in my opinion, there is a lot less of a need to mute strings in ukulele playing. String muting is the most unsung guitar skill but can literally make or break your playing. Also, put on a low g and you have an instrument voiced completely different yet played the same. Personally, switching back and forth between the 2 is a huge appeal for me. Finally, the ukulele community seems to have a lot less music snobbery imbedded. Ukers seem to be willing to strum and sing most anything and have fun doing it!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    East Midlands UK
    Posts
    377

    Default

    Played guitar for forty seven/eight years, then stumbled upon the ukuklele. Gave away my solid electric guitar, my trusty 12 string acoustic,my Ovation acoustic/electric and a nondescript 6 string acoustic that had served me well; all went to good friends,and I never regretted it. Played a friends guitar for ten minutes a couple of years ago, and while I could still manage it,and it all sounded okay, the spark that had driven me to guitar in the first place, was lacking. I wanted to return to my ukes!
    All power and respect to you Concert,Tenor and Baritone players, but Soprano is what does it for me every time! (And my beautiful Sopranino!)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Pickering, ON, Canada
    Posts
    6,079

    Default

    I am the opposite. Noodled on guitar for a few years about 15 years ago then stopped. About 6 years ago I picked up the ukulele and started attending uke jams, got seriously addicted. I picked up the guitar again 2 years ago and rediscovered how much I loved the sound of a steel string acoustic. That’s pretty much all I have played since Covid happened and I was laid off for four months. I know when our uke jams reopen I will be back at the ukulele. It was the social aspect of the jams, joining bands, doing open mic performances that really appealed to me. So I love both, just guitar a little more right now.
    Last edited by DownUpDave; 09-13-2020 at 12:20 AM.
    Currently enjoying these ukuleles : *LdfM tenor, *LfdM 19" super tenor. *LfdM baritone, *I'iwi tenor , *Koolau tenor, *Webber tenor, *Kimo tenor, *Kimo super concert, *Mya Moe baritone, *Kamaka baritone, *Gianinni baritone, *Fred Shields walnut pineapple super soprano, *Kala super soprano, *Loprinzi super soprano, *Black bear ULO concert , *Enya X1 concert, *Enya X1 pineapple soprano, *Enya Nova *Gretsch tenor, *Korala plastic concert

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    107

    Default

    I played guitar for around 20 years before picking up the uke. "Played" is a generous use of the word. I was a strum and singer. I could hold my own in a praise team setting, but I didn't really understand what I was doing or why I was doing it. Then I picked up the uke around 3 years ago. I now enjoy playing both, but most of my time is spent on uke, my knowledge of music theory and of the fretboard is much more grounded on the uke, and I really only pick up my guitar to lead worship as a strum and sing guy while I play more chord melody and fingerstyle on the uke.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    673

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mikhou View Post
    I played guitar for around 20 years before picking up the uke. "Played" is a generous use of the word. I was a strum and singer. I could hold my own in a praise team setting, but I didn't really understand what I was doing or why I was doing it. Then I picked up the uke around 3 years ago. I now enjoy playing both, but most of my time is spent on uke, my knowledge of music theory and of the fretboard is much more grounded on the uke, and I really only pick up my guitar to lead worship as a strum and sing guy while I play more chord melody and fingerstyle on the uke.
    With ukulele, all things are more like song oriented. We can't play solos as easy as with guitar. About 47 years ago, I started with classical guitar playing, taking it quite seriously. Soon moved to electric after noticing my nails would not last easy.
    Also acoustic guitar.

    Guitar players have this obstacle. It can only be played in fewer keys, easy. Our limited ukes can play in every (almost) key without a capo. There is a trap say with an electric one, to make solos sound great. I fell to that too.

    With our more limited instruments we don't have that. To play ukulele we have to concentrate more on chords and stuff. Guitar is of course the uber instrument, it always will be, but the uke is so nice a folk singster.
    And in my opinion a better one to learn music theory for that reason.

  10. #10

    Default

    For me, the uke perfectly complements my electric guitar.

    In order to play electric, I have to get around a very heavy and big solid body guitar, hook it up to the pedals, amps, turn everything on, find a good settings... by the time I start playing I've probably already wasted almost 10 minutes.

    With my uke I just pick it up and start strumming and/or noodling.

    Depending on how much involved I want to get into playing something, I choose one of the two.

    As I said, they are really a great match.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •