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Thread: Covid inspired Ukulele.......The Covilele???

  1. #31

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    We all know what it is like to get hung up on the details and concerned about screwing up that nice piece of wood.

    I would recommend that you ease your mind by practicing the shaping of the neck on some scrap wood. Just dimension a piece of knot free wood (years ago when I made my first neck I just used a piece of 2x4 that I dimensioned to the same specs as my mahogany board I intended to use). It went great and I worked out all my concerns to then move on to the real deal with confidence....

    You can always have another go with scrap wood which will allow you the freedom to experiment and find what techniques and tools work best for you, but that nice piece of well seasoned timber is harder to replace and so you will feel way more pressure and a resistance to experiment. You can also try different neck profiles work out your joinery if that is of concern...you know work out all the kinks and end up where you want to be without as much stress.

    Hope it helps and I am sure you will do great when the time comes....
    Last edited by Jardin; 11-14-2020 at 06:02 AM.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
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    414

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    19mm is more than thick enough for a typical truss rod - as long as you have 3 - 4 mm behind the rod you're fine. I think you'll find your plan to end up with a total thickness of 30 - 35mm will feel really thick. Most commercial ukes or smaller guitars have total thicknesses more in the range of 18mm at the nut up to 25 near the heel.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Little River, California
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    2,759

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    Quote Originally Posted by dwizum View Post
    ...thicknesses more in the range of 18mm at the nut up to 25 near the heel.
    Agreed. 35mm would feel like a baseball bat... The trend has been for thinner and thinner necks over the years. One of the first to go with the thinner neck was Bob Taylor and I've always liked the feel of his guitars. They are marketed as "fast" necks (always the marketing). But of course it all depends on what the player feels comfortable with. It is an individual thing... l think that inexperienced builders tend to leave too much wood behind out of fear they will go too far and ruin the work. I know my first few necks were carved too thick and I really had to take them back. Having an ukulele you like the feel of is important. Then just steal (copy) the dimensions.

  4. #34
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    Oct 2014
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    Since that is an adjustable truss rod, do not glue it in as suggested with the previous non-adjustable rod. But you knew that.

  5. #35
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    Jun 2020
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    414

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    I use those same generic blue-wrapped rods all the time in basses and guitars, and I don't do anything special to prevent rattles. If the slot is the right dimension there's really no need. Sometimes if the rod is totally slack it can have a slight rattle, but you can just give the nut a tiny little turn in either direction to put some tension on the rod and the rattle stops. Not a big deal.

  6. #36
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    Jun 2020
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    Yes, the face of the nut gets aligned with the edge of the fretboard.

  7. #37
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    Jun 2020
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    One thing to consider, though it depends on your headstock design. Since that rod appears to have round nuts at each end (instead of a square block) it could be made easily removable, if you're worried about dealing with a broken rod. On a tilt back headstock, it's pretty easy to do this by routing the channel clear out the face of the headstock. Then if the rod ever needs to be replaced, it can just be pulled out from the headstock end. If the headstock won't allow that, you can flip flop the rod for a butt end adjustment (as long as you route a pocked in the body to allow a wrench to reach it) and make it removable out that end. Of course, rod breakage is pretty rare, but I figure if it's something that's possible with a given design, it's at least worth considering.

  8. #38
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    Oct 2014
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    Little River, California
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayne01 View Post
    Then trimmed the fretboard to the correct size and glued it to the neck blank.
    You can do it that way, but I attach the fretboard after I trim and shape the neck blank because if something goes wrong shaping the neck (what could possibly go wrong?), then I don't have to remove the fretboard which can be a tedious process and inevitably damages the valuable fretboard.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
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    Looks great! Now I'm becoming inspired to build one of these too.

    My real motivation is that I'm refurbishing an old tenor banjo, and I anticipate that actually learning to play the tenor banjo could damage my marriage (I've found that practicing finger picking patterns takes a lot of repetition, and banjos are loud instruments). So I want to build an electric tenor guitar with the same scale length (22.5") and string spacing. While I'm going to the effort, I might as well put a pickup in it so it could be played with headphones or plugged into an amp. I'm thinking of using a typical uke-type bridge and an under-saddle piezo pickup.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    17

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    Ukealot:
    Try stuffing a pair of socks under the skin in the bridge area. This will muffle a lot of the sound and your wife will be less disturbed by your learning the instrument. There's usually a dowel or bar from neck to tail to keep the pot round. Wedge the socks between this and the head.

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