Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24

Thread: Drum sanders

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Hawaii Island
    Posts
    227

    Default Drum sanders

    I was asked by a friend today for a recommendation for a small drum sander. I use a wide belt sander, so could not help him, but said I'd ask around. He was told by Shop Fox not to sand anything to less than 3.5mm and to not use a backing board due to kickback. That does not seem right to me, but that's what he was told.So, if you can provide any experience with currently available drum sander, I'd appreciate it. Probably not looking for the higher dollar sanders. Thanks and enjoy your music!-Bob

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    central CA
    Posts
    719

    Default

    I have a Jet 16-32 plus that I just love but I believe it's in the neighborhood $1000.00-$1100.00 so prob wont work for him. I sand down to 1/16" often
    My Real name is Terry Harris

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Cairns, Australia
    Posts
    2,436

    Default

    I use a 24" wide twin drum sander marketed here in Australia by Carbatec. Made in China.

    It's a huge step up from the Jet/Performax ones that are cantilevered. I can easily sand down to 1.0mm just on the rubber conveyor belt.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    348

    Default

    I have a Jet 10-20. It definitely fits the bill of "smaller drum sander" yet it has plenty of power and good build quality. I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it. It will go thinner than you'll ever need for uke work, I routinely sand material that's approaching veneer thickness (for headplate veneers and other purposes). I do this right on the conveyor belt, no backer. Some other small sanders have travel stops that would prevent this, at least without a backer board. The 10" width is enough to sand a glued up back or soundboard for a tenor uke, or you can do wider pieces in multiple passes since it's cantilevered. If I had the space for a bigger sander I'd probably own one instead of this, but this thing is extremely convenient in a small crowded shop since I can just set it on my main workbench when I'm using it, or set it out of the way in storage when I'm not.

    My only other real reference for a drum sander is the one a friend of mine owned until he recently moved and sold it - it was a gigantic dual drum machine that was a total powerhouse. And nearly the size of a small car. I thought I would hate every second of using a small machine after being used to that monster, but I was more than surprised with how nice this Jet is.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Tampere, Finland
    Posts
    52

    Default

    I bought Jet 16-32 about 2 years ago and I like it very much.
    "If everything seems under control, you're just not going fast enough."
    -Mario Andretti

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Stockton on Tees..North East UK.
    Posts
    5,539

    Default

    The new Jet 10-20 + looks good to me https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8O8lJiRYQ2Q
    ..The old version with the stripped thread problems is a no no.
    Last edited by Timbuck; 01-13-2021 at 12:50 PM.
    http://ukulele-innovation.tripod.com ebay i/d squarepeg_3000 Email timmsken@hotmail.com

    If you can believe that moving images and sound, can fly through empty space across the universe and be seen and heard on a box in your living room ?.. then you can believe in anything.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    So. Oregon
    Posts
    1,792

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Hi, I'm the friend referenced in Bob's post. I live in Vermont am limited in space and ability to move heavy machinery into my basement shop. I currently use a helix head planer with a backing board but it's real tough on thin figured wood. I appreciate all the input. I have seen the Jet 10-20 write top but it's nice to know real people who have experience with the tool. Thanks again for the input!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Little River, California
    Posts
    2,652

    Default

    I think it needs to be emphasized that drum sanders are great machines for thinning wood and an absolute must for a shop that puts out a lot of ukuleles, but a person just starting out or a person who only plans on building one or two or maybe three ukes, a block plane and a orbital sander will do the job just fine. In other words, you don't necessarily need a drum sander to make an ukulele.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Hawaii and Alaska
    Posts
    73

    Default

    Build your own... cost is low. Plenty of info on the web. I have build three of these and they work great. I have a 16- 32 sander to do heavy work but you can do anything with this one. It does not have a mechanical feed. You must push it through (I call it a meat servo) but I find that with feel it works great.... I use it to size nuts and saddles also.... bindings ....almost everythingDSCF4611.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •