Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26

Thread: Your Favorite Ukulele Cleaning Method

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Posts
    328

    Default Your Favorite Ukulele Cleaning Method

    I'm about to gift a couple of ukes and would like to clean them up. One has a gloss finish and the other satin. They're both in good shape, but I would like to remove the very light marks on the body that light use has put on them. I've always used a slightly damp cloth but wondered if there are other, perhaps better approaches. Any thoughts?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    791

    Default

    Buying a new one.

    Just kidding. I semi-regularly simply wipe my ukes with a microfibre cloth after playing to keep them more or less clean. Usually satin finishes don't even require anything else. Gloss finishes are more prone to getting guff stuck on it. Usually I do what you do, i.e., just use a damp cloth. I haven't gotten any of my ukes so dirty that they'd need some sort of product but if I did I'd probably use the one from Music Nomad. They have some decent stuff overall for guitars and ukes and they have a cleaner for both types of finishes.
    Last edited by Dohle; 01-13-2021 at 09:34 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    362

    Default

    Microfiber cloths make a big difference. I generally use microfiber cloths with a small amount of very hot water on them. This can cut through very stubborn years-old finger grease on fretboards (the joys of repairing other people's instruments!).

    As a general rule, I don't use solvents of any kind unless I am 100% dead certain I know the exact makeup of the finish that was applied to an instrument. There's just too much risk in an incompatible solvent ruining a finish. Especially on ukes, since there's a pretty wide variety of finishes used by different brands and makers that can look and feel similar, yet have different levels of resistance to common solvents.

    I also generally avoid any sort of polish, oil, wax, or other product that is intended to add shine or "protect" a finish, since it's pretty common for them to cause problems down the road (i.e. interfere with repairs or refinish work).

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    619

    Default

    If it's never, try a little https://www.musiciansfriend.com/acce...mate-lemon-oil on the fretboard. It'll make it look like new.
    To apply, loosen strings, wipe on (just a little goes a long way); do not use too much.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    9,251

    Default

    Spit on it and wipe it off with my sleeve. Nobody else picks up my ukes!
    "Those who bring sunshine and laughter to the lives of others cannot keep it from themselves".

    Music washes from the soul, the dust of everyday living.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Sparta, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    2,888

    Default

    I use a microfiber cloth and gently give my ukes a gentle wipe down.

    If I inadvertently got some food or other schmutz on one of them, I use a barely damp cloth to clean it and then make sure it's completely dry afterward. Be very careful that the damp does not reach the sound hole, the insides of the body, some bridges, or the fretboard. Because usually, none of these parts have a finish on them. If that doesn't get it off, I'll use a little Music Nomad Guitar Detailer for Matte and Gloss Finishes. It's a cleaner and light polish.
    There is a subtle yet profound difference between the learning of something and the knowing of that thing.
    You can learn by reading, but you don’t begin to know until you begin to try to do.

    —Lou Churchill, Plane & Pilot Magazine

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    115

    Default

    Throw it in the washing machine? Just kidding, of course.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southern California, USA
    Posts
    449

    Default

    I like the music nomad stuff. Works well and smells nice. Supposedly safe on gloss or matte finishes.
    Everyone I know who is into the ukulele is 'crackers' so get yourself a few and enjoy yourselves - George Harrison

    Some of my faves right now: *Kamaka HF-3D2I *Kamaka HF-3D Anniversary *Kamaka HB-2D *Sumi Kobo Spruce/Maple Tenor *Blackbird Farallon Sunburst *Blackbird Clara *KoAloha KTM-00 *Concert Flea

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    London
    Posts
    701

    Default

    Microfibre cloth and a very soft paintbrush for any dust around the nut and saddle. I have some Planet Waves Lemon oil which I used to use on a Mya Moe and a satin finish KoAloha I had once. That did make them look like new. One bottle of that will last a lifetime.
    Kamaka HF-3DC - KoAloha KTM-S00 - Kanile'a SUS B DLX - Kanile'a K-1B - Pono MGTP5-PC

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    2,761

    Default

    When I change strings, I wipe them down with lemon oil, especially the fretboard, been doing this for years. Just wipe on and wipe off, I've used it on everything from an old Martin to new Kanile'a and Martin Iz, matte finishes. It will clean gloss with no problem too. Just wipe it off the body right away, won't hurt to let soak on the fretboard a little.
    Just Play

    Sopranos: 1st uke, Lanikai soprano LU-11 - Aquilas | 30's Martin style 0 - Martins
    Concerts: Kanile'a K-2 CP - Living Water | Islander AC-4 - Living Water | Waverly Street banjolele - Worth Browns
    Tenor: Martin Iz - Living Water low G
    UBass: Kala FS2 (fretless) - Pahoehoe | Kala Acacia - Pahoehoe

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •