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Thread: Rearranging Re-Entrant GCEA to Low gCEA Cheat

  1. #1
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    Default Rearranging Re-Entrant GCEA to Low gCEA Cheat

    Aloha UU'ers, not sure if this is the right forum and will be happy to move this topic to the correct forum.

    Been in several FB comment discussions where I've shared my trick for short term low g fix for people looking to experiment with low g. There's been some debate as to whether my method works so I would def appreciate comments from other experienced ukers.

    First, I'd like to say that I'm still vetting this cheat across my ukes but so far seems it seems to work for me. I have this done with Martin Fluorocarbon a solid spruce / solid ziricote b&s tenor (with compensated saddle), solid mango pineapple tenor, Enya Nova U concert (with compensated saddle), and a long neck solid koa soprano.

    Cheat: Rearrange re-entrant GCEA Martin Fluorocarbon strings on a tenor, concert and soprano to low g by using C string > low g, E > C, G > E, A staying the same.

    My reason for doing this: Prefer Martin Fluorocarbons and unwound low G to wound low G as, in my opinion, the bass of a wound low G over powers the rest of the strings. If anything I would prefer half and half wound vs unwound like baritone uke string sets for a more even balance but I haven't seen a low g set like this.

    I felt this would work because rearranging strings by order of thickness is similar to how linear tuned string sets work. Martin FCs tend to be high tension already so to me, the difference in tension is acceptable - certainly not floppy by any means. There's a bit more sustain and body because of lower tension for the first 3 strings that I think actually helps to highlight the A string a bit more as sometimes on my re-entrant ukes the A-string note changes don't power through as much as I'd like.

    I think this works better on non-compensated saddles vs. compensated saddles set up to re-entrant GCEA. Possibly better on concert and up. Intonation down the neck seems to be acceptable within 15 cents as long as you are open to adjusting your open string within 15 cents as well.

    I recently emailed Martin Customer Support to get their feedback on my method.

    Thoughts? Has anybody else tried this before? Anybody willing to try this and give me their feedback? Mahalo!

  2. #2
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    This is the correct Forum, as far as I know.
    I've never tried this "cheat".
    Actually, GCEA denotes lo G setup. It shows a linear progression.
    gCEA denotes re-entrant setup.

    Fixed it for you.
    "Those who bring sunshine and laughter to the lives of others cannot keep it from themselves".

    Music washes from the soul, the dust of everyday living.

  3. #3
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    I haven't tried it. It doesn't seem like it would work particularly well from a "design" perspective - meaning that your strings are going to end up at very different tensions than intended. But if it works for you and your ukes, great.

    You can do wound G & C. For example, on tenor, the Thomastik-Infeld CF30 and CF27 strings should work great.
    Ukulele:
    Iriguchi Tenor "Weeble" - A, WoU Clarity
    Blue Star 19" baritone Konablaster - DGBE
    Cocobolo 16" SC#1-gCEA, SC SLMU
    Ono #42 19" baritone, Ab, LW
    Imua iET-Bb, M600
    Covered Bridge CLN pineapple - Eb cuatro, SC XLL
    Rogue bari
    Bonanza super tenor, cFAD SC LHU
    Kala KSLNG, Eb SC XLU
    Hanson 5-string tenor, dGCEA
    Bonanza SLN GCEA
    Southern Cross concert GCEA
    Guitars:
    Jupiter #47, G, TI CF127
    Pelem, B reentrant
    Jupiter #71, A, UG1

    !Flukutronic!

  4. #4
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    I think this is an interesting idea to throw your high g on top, and move all your other strings down one where your C string becomes your low G string, thus giving you GCEA low G tuning instead of gCEA, re-entrant high g tuning. I wish I had an extra set of strings, they are in the mail, and I'm not sure I could re-string the ones that came with my Uke since they are clipped short and may not catch the post again. I would hate to wait around not playing. I ordered a low G since my Uke came strung with high g and I decided to give it a go for a few months before swapping them out.

    Do you find them too slack, or are they nice?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Hanks View Post
    I haven't tried it. It doesn't seem like it would work particularly well from a "design" perspective - meaning that your strings are going to end up at very different tensions than intended. But if it works for you and your ukes, great.

    You can do wound G & C. For example, on tenor, the Thomastik-Infeld CF30 and CF27 strings should work great.
    String tension is different but the difference doesn't affect playability as much as one might theorize... your first 3 strings would have same tension ending in the thinnest string being the highest tension. I think if you had alternating tensions playability would be more of an issue.

    Also, seems like different FC string sets from different makers have different tensions as well as some brands having varying tension sets for same scale ukes. Because of this I reasoned that tension within a certain range matters more for preference vs actual playability.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike $ View Post
    I think this is an interesting idea to throw your high g on top, and move all your other strings down one where your C string becomes your low G string, thus giving you GCEA low G tuning instead of gCEA, re-entrant high g tuning. I wish I had an extra set of strings, they are in the mail, and I'm not sure I could re-string the ones that came with my Uke since they are clipped short and may not catch the post again. I would hate to wait around not playing. I ordered a low G since my Uke came strung with high g and I decided to give it a go for a few months before swapping them out.

    Do you find them too slack, or are they nice?
    Just to clarify, you are doing the rearranging with the bottom 3 strings. Your first string, A will stay in place. Personally, I think the difference in tension is very acceptable. If you are restringing with the same set from re-entrant tuning you need to let the strings tighten up a bit and then get them settled after restringing. But this is just my opinion and seeing what others have to say after trying it out themselves.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickie View Post
    This is the correct Forum, as far as I know.
    I've never tried this "cheat".
    Actually, GCEA denotes lo G setup. It shows a linear progression.
    gCEA denotes re-entrant setup.

    Fixed it for you.
    Mahalo Nickie!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by roastbeast View Post
    Just to clarify, you are doing the rearranging with the bottom 3 strings. Your first string, A will stay in place. Personally, I think the difference in tension is very acceptable. If you are restringing with the same set from re-entrant tuning you need to let the strings tighten up a bit and then get them settled after restringing. But this is just my opinion and seeing what others have to say after trying it out themselves.
    Yes, I see where I went wrong. I just retuned my uke and left the strings in place just to hear how they each sound, and the A and E sound about the same and the C and G sound a little slack and go out of tune a bit on my uke when fretting. But it was worth the time for me to experiment. Perhaps a different set of strings might perform better with your technique. I am have Worth clear on now.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by roastbeast View Post
    Mahalo Nickie!
    You are so very welcome!
    "Those who bring sunshine and laughter to the lives of others cannot keep it from themselves".

    Music washes from the soul, the dust of everyday living.

  10. #10
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    It sounds feasible but it also sounds like a lot of work with strings that will be all curly from being wound around posts and tied to bridges. Why not just buy a low-G string and change the one string?

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