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Thread: Beginning Baritone Music Theory Question

  1. #11
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    You can also buy gCEA string for banitone Ukulele. If you change the string you will be able to play along with the countless youtube videos and lesson made for gCEA tuning.

  2. #12
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    Default notation is correct

    The G note you highlighted is the low G in the ukulele in a tenor ukulele, or the 3rd string in the baritone. It is written correctly.

    Eugenio


    Quote Originally Posted by TodR View Post
    I attached a photo of an example from the book. How do I play that note on my baritone uke?

  3. #13
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    The chords shown are GCEA tuning. With a low G.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by electrocio View Post
    most (non-guitarist) will say middle C is not relative. Middle C is specific to the piano, guitars just play transposed. Actual middle C is C4 but guitars are a transposed instrument so when reading a guitar notation what looks like middle c in standard notation is actually c3 in guitar notation. This is done so as to not have to use both a bass and treble clef when using staff notation for guitar.
    Middle C is middle C, and that note in scientific pitch notation is C4. Sometimes, you hear people call middle C "C3", e.g. Yamaha; but that's in the small minority. For guitars, the middle C is label C4 (following scientific pitch notation); it has nothing to do with using both treble and bass clefs. The clefs are something used in staff notation (i.e. standard notation) and has nothing to do with C3 vs C4.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill1 View Post
    This post has asked how to play the music presented in standard notation on a baritone ukulele. The beginners here may have no idea about SPN or the other forms of notation, they just want to work out how to play the music on their baritone ukuleles as it is presented in standard notation.

    On a piano the note in the middle of the keyboard is a C note that has an interval or ratio of 4 octaves from the C0 note, which I think is the lowest note on the keyboard. So its labelled C4, or middle C. So standard notation for piano is presented with the C4 note in the middle between the bass and treble. It lives on a ledger line just under the staff that has the treble clef.

    On a guitar, its different. If you write music for a guitar with the middle note as C4, it looks like a mess and its hard to read. So they decided to just use the middle note as a reference and push it down an octave to C3, then the written standard notation looks much neater and easier to read. Maybe there are other reasons as well.

    So the lesson is that the middle note can be relative. Even though the notation looks exactly the same, if may have been transposed by an octave.

    Now if you are accompanying other instruments, you want to make sure you are playing in the right octave. This is where you can latch onto a labelling system like ABC or SPN to find out what is the right octave with some pedantic application of definitions. Old hands be able to recount endless tales of Middle C and C3 and C4 etc., but all you need to know is what octave the band or group is using so you can read the music and play along.

    As this question does not seem to relate to groups or bands, I think you can be quite safe as a baritone beginner just treating the middle C as a relative centre of the music in order to decode the tunes in your songbook.
    The OP's question can easily be answered if that melody was originally written for the guitar (i.e. the "you" is at the G above the low E). Book's author may have retained the original melody for singing, as the baritone uke is used in accompaniment role.

    The lowest note on an 88-key piano is A0, in SPN.

    C4 is the name given to middle C in scientific pitch notation. If you go by Yamaha's naming convention, then that C4 SPN is called C3 (Yamaha). I.e. they both have the same frequency and refer to the same pitch.

    "Middle note" has not much meaning. It isn't the same as middle C.

    Middle C isn't necessarily the middle C note on a piano; but middle C is always the C note in the middle between the treble and bass clefs.
    Last edited by clear; 01-27-2021 at 01:10 PM.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by emarcano View Post
    The G note you highlighted is the low G in the ukulele in a tenor ukulele, or the 3rd string in the baritone. It is written correctly.

    Eugenio
    My Baritone Beginners books says an open G string is an octave higher, see attachment. But now that you said the G string on the baritone is the same as the Low G on a tenor, they sound the same.

    If that is true then my beginners book is wrong? That seems weird because they are all Hal Leonard books.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by TodR View Post
    My Baritone Beginners books says an open G string is an octave higher, see attachment. But now that you said the G string on the baritone is the same as the Low G on a tenor, they sound the same.

    If that is true then my beginners book is wrong? That seems weird because they are all Hal Leonard books.
    This looks correct to me. If I were to write a low G that's where I would put it too. But I see the conflict with the melody note in the first example. Obviously books like this are not perfect so you may have to live with the conflict and transpose by an octave where needed.
    Last edited by merlin666; 01-27-2021 at 07:35 AM.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by merlin666 View Post
    This looks correct to me. If I were to write a low G that's where I would put it too. But I see the conflict with the melody note in the first example. Obviously books like this are not perfect so you may have to live with the conflict and transpose by an octave where needed.
    I'll try transposing by one octave on those low notes. I'm still pretty slow at finding the notes when I play so transposing on the fly will be a mind bender. Looking forward to trying it. Thanks!

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by TodR View Post
    My Baritone Beginners books says an open G string is an octave higher, see attachment. But now that you said the G string on the baritone is the same as the Low G on a tenor, they sound the same.

    If that is true then my beginners book is wrong? That seems weird because they are all Hal Leonard books.
    Your book is correct.

    I looked at your post #3 again, and noticed that the "you" is actually a "G" note. Initially, I thought it was a "E", so what I posted earlier isn't totally correct WRT the note name; but the book's melody is like still for the guitar with just the chord charts changed for the uke.
    Last edited by clear; 01-27-2021 at 01:09 PM.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by clear View Post
    Your book is correct.

    I looked at your post #3 again, and noticed that the "you" is actually a "G" note. Initially, I thought it was a "E", so what I posted earlier isn't totally correct WRT the note name; but the book's melody is like still for the guitar with just the chord charts changed for the uke.
    Thanks for the follow up. I had some buyers remorse when I revived the book but now that I understand the material a little better I'm glad I have it.

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