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Thread: Alternate Planer

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
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    Sheffield, England
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    I own both an original Wagner and the stew Mac variety. I think they are great for a small shop. There is a good Robbie O'Brien YouTube video on using them. Thicknessing back and side with a router would not be as easy as with one of these. Use mine on every instrument.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerryc41 View Post
    I see Amazon has similar items for lower prices.

    https://smile.amazon.com/s?k=rotary+...f=nb_sb_noss_2
    I haven't looked at the offerings on Amazon, but I will say you may not want to chase the cheapest example of this kind of tool. You really want it to be accurately machined, and you really really want the blades to stay fixed in the cutting head at the proper adjustment they were set at. And as someone else noted, the quality of the steel in the blades may be variable.

    I don't have a drill press version of this tool, but I do have one for my radial arm saw. I've used it a couple of times over the past 20 years. It did work ok, and I did avoid harming myself while using it, so I've been considering whether I should try it during my next instrument-making endeavor.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Stockton on Tees..North East UK.
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    5,748

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    Quote Originally Posted by Uke-alot View Post
    I haven't looked at the offerings on Amazon, but I will say you may not want to chase the cheapest example of this kind of tool. You really want it to be accurately machined, and you really really want the blades to stay fixed in the cutting head at the proper adjustment they were set at. And as someone else noted, the quality of the steel in the blades may be variable.

    I don't have a drill press version of this tool, but I do have one for my radial arm saw. I've used it a couple of times over the past 20 years. It did work ok, and I did avoid harming myself while using it, so I've been considering whether I should try it during my next instrument-making endeavor.
    I believe they were originaly designed for the Radial Arm Saw ..but these are left handed versions and cant be used on a pedestal drill unless you can run it in reverse..the thing that i dont like about them on the pedestal drill is that they load the bearings sideways causing premature wear.
    Here is a video of one in use with the Radial Arm Saw. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RiJuKVuC-Cs
    Last edited by Timbuck; 02-02-2021 at 10:10 PM.
    http://ukulele-innovation.tripod.com ebay i/d squarepeg_3000 Email timmsken@hotmail.com

    If you can believe that moving images and sound, can fly through empty space across the universe and be seen and heard on a box in your living room ?.. then you can believe in anything.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
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    Catskill Mountains, NY
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    8,134

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    It sounds like a very good product - for the one selling it.
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
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    149

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    Quote Originally Posted by Timbuck View Post
    I believe they were originaly designed for the Radial Arm Saw ..but these are left handed versions and cant be used on a pedestal drill unless you can run it in reverse..the thing that i dont like about them on the pedestal drill is that they load the bearings sideways causing premature wear.
    Here is a video of one in use with the Radial Arm Saw. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RiJuKVuC-Cs
    You're correct. The one I have is specific to the radial arm saw and can't be used on a drill press. The rotation is opposite, and the one I have is designed to screw onto the saw arbor. Nevertheless, it works similarly to the drill press version.

  6. #16
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    Mar 2009
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    Stockton on Tees..North East UK.
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    As I said earlier the original safe-T- planer put pressure sideways on the pedestal drill bearings..but the Stewmac version is quite a bit smaller in diameter and this should help reduce the pressure quite a bit.

    131F1164-F820-4DC5-BF08-15224EDFB9CE by Ken Timms, on Flickr
    Last edited by Timbuck; 02-03-2021 at 06:58 AM.
    http://ukulele-innovation.tripod.com ebay i/d squarepeg_3000 Email timmsken@hotmail.com

    If you can believe that moving images and sound, can fly through empty space across the universe and be seen and heard on a box in your living room ?.. then you can believe in anything.

  7. #17

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    I could see a very useful tool for ukulele building that ran three of these at once doing what a planer will without the risk of tear out.
    Michael Smith
    Goat Rock Ukulele
    www.goatrockukulele.com

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Location
    Branford, Connecticut
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    I have used a Safe-T-Planer for years, and have done good work with it. For someone with limited space it makes it possible to plane things you would otherwise have to do by hand. If you follow the instructions and use the tool within it's limits, it will produce good results. In this YouTube video you can see how I will use the planer to do a neck. Many years ago when I had neither the space nor funds to own a planer or drum sander, I made many clock cases using the Safe-T-Planer.

    Regards
    Ed

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Maine, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timbuck View Post
    As I said earlier the original safe-T- planer put pressure sideways on the pedestal drill bearings..but the Stewmac version is quite a bit smaller in diameter and this should help reduce the pressure quite a bit.

    131F1164-F820-4DC5-BF08-15224EDFB9CE by Ken Timms, on Flickr
    My Wagner Safety-T-Planer looks more like your Stew-Mac version, except the SM planer cutters have two teeth. My Wagner one had the same pat. no. as yours. Isn't yours one of the ones made for radial arm saws? Mine has the round shank for mounting in a chuck, just like the SM version.

    I used mine for thicknessing thin wood and it working pretty well but I always felt nervous using it. Chip collection was a problem too. I haven't touched it since I got my thickness sander.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Virginia Beach, Virginia
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    163

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    I have the original Safe-T-Planer and have only used it a couple of times. There is another version out there that I have heard very good reviews of. It is called the Super Six Planer and it is sold by Miguel of Musictools out of Brazil. He is a friend of Robbie O'Brien. Robbie did a YouTube video review of it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oZlUmP91pnQ

    Their catalog is in Portuguese, but the translated description says: "This is our exclusive version of the high-performance Safe T Planer - the 6-insert model. The doubling of the cutting efficiency provides a better finished surface, smoothness in operation, less heating of the inserts and sharpening longevity. They are 300 cuts per second generating micro chips. For professionals who demand extreme cut quality and precision."

    I believe the price is around $100 US, but you would have to confirm.

    http://musictools.com.br
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