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Thread: Re-Saw day

  1. #1
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    Default Re-Saw day

    The weather today is not very good here in the North East..rain, snow , sleet, etc: but I managed to saw a few slices ready for later in the year when the sun returns.
    AD36C620-FDD4-447F-A800-6B41ABC7603B by Ken Timms, on Flickr
    Last edited by Timbuck; 02-07-2021 at 03:33 AM.
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    If you can believe that moving images and sound, can fly through empty space across the universe and be seen and heard on a box in your living room ?.. then you can believe in anything.

  2. #2
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    The piece on the right appears flat sawn to me. Is there a concern that it is not quarter sawn? My understanding is that you want quarter sawn pieces to lessen the movement caused by humidity variations.

  3. #3
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    Perhaps I’ve miscounted but that looks like about fifteen sets to me and another fifteen Timms Sopranos is good news for the Uke playing community. I suspect that there’ll be a lot of happy customers by the Summer, I wish the successful bidders hours of joy with their Timms ... and maybe, too, that I win the lottery so that one of them could be mine .

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Friesen5 View Post
    The piece on the right appears flat sawn to me. Is there a concern that it is not quarter sawn? My understanding is that you want quarter sawn pieces to lessen the movement caused by humidity variations.
    True! quarter sawn does move less..But flat sawn is more stiff ..I find it works well on sopranos...we’ve discussed this before https://forum.ukuleleunderground.com...-sawn-as-a-top
    Last edited by Timbuck; 02-07-2021 at 05:26 AM.
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    If you can believe that moving images and sound, can fly through empty space across the universe and be seen and heard on a box in your living room ?.. then you can believe in anything.

  5. #5
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    How thick do you resaw these parts? I assume they all get drum-sanded later to final thickness.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uke-alot View Post
    How thick do you resaw these parts? I assume they all get drum-sanded later to final thickness.
    I try and resaw them at 3/16” then sand them down to .075” for the backs and sides..and the tops at .065” ish depending on the flexibility.
    http://ukulele-innovation.tripod.com ebay i/d squarepeg_3000 Email timmsken@hotmail.com

    If you can believe that moving images and sound, can fly through empty space across the universe and be seen and heard on a box in your living room ?.. then you can believe in anything.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timbuck View Post
    I try and resaw them at 3/16” then sand them down to .075” for the backs and sides..and the tops at .065” ish depending on the flexibility.
    Thanks! So they're a little over twice their final thickness for back and sides. I haven't resawed parts before (I didn't have the bandsaw to do it, but I just got one and I'm now working to get everything set up right and have acquired a suitable blade). I had been contemplating aiming to cut them a little thinner than you are, but maybe that's not a good idea? I'll be starting with cherry and red maple, most likely. I don't have a drum sander, so I will likely be hand planing to final thickness for the time being.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uke-alot View Post
    I haven't resawed parts before (I didn't have the bandsaw to do it, but I just got one and I'm now working to get everything set up right and have acquired a suitable blade).
    It's the set up that counts keep the base of the billet square to the fence and dont apply too much side pressure co's thats what wears the side of the blade and causes drift...It can be dissapointing when you think you've sawn a nice even slice and it ends up 4mm thick at the top and and only 1mm at the bottom ...Or even worse if you get cupping
    ..some guys even sand or plane the billet flat on the face side after each pass...But I found that to be wasteful.
    There are many other different techniques for sawing veneers with or without the fence....find one that suits you.
    Last edited by Timbuck; 02-07-2021 at 10:33 PM.
    http://ukulele-innovation.tripod.com ebay i/d squarepeg_3000 Email timmsken@hotmail.com

    If you can believe that moving images and sound, can fly through empty space across the universe and be seen and heard on a box in your living room ?.. then you can believe in anything.

  9. #9
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    I'm glad you post stuff like this Ken. Too much store is placed in the 'quartersawn' paradigm. It is roundly ignored when people want a 'quilted' or 'birdseye' figure in maple. And FYI - most BR these days is either flat sawn or rift sawn. What say ye all then?

    Side Bar: It's 46 years since I studied it but a recall that quartersawn oak moves 0.125" across a width dimension of 12". Maybe someone can fact check me on this because I cannot remember the value for flat sawn and am too tired to Google it. A little bit of technical knowledge more qualified than mine would certainly further inform this discussion.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Howlett View Post
    I'm glad you post stuff like this Ken. Too much store is placed in the 'quartersawn' paradigm. It is roundly ignored when people want a 'quilted' or 'birdseye' figure in maple. And FYI - most BR these days is either flat sawn or rift sawn. What say ye all then?

    Side Bar: It's 46 years since I studied it but a recall that quartersawn oak moves 0.125" across a width dimension of 12". Maybe someone can fact check me on this because I cannot remember the value for flat sawn and am too tired to Google it. A little bit of technical knowledge more qualified than mine would certainly further inform this discussion.
    The answer strongly depends on the seasonal change in moisture content. If the wooden object lives in a typical climate-controlled space year round, sources say to figure on a 3% net change (this being the wood's change in moisture content, not the change of R.H. in the environment). For white oak, the 10" quartersawn board would move 0.054" (a little under 1/16th), and the flatsawn board would move about twice as much, 0.11" (a little under 1/8th). If the wood is not in a climate controlled space, you could hit 1/8th" movement for the quartersawn board.

    I suppose it's good to climate control your shop to 40 - 50% R.H., and that way your project starts out in the middle of its width range. Then it can probably survive pretty big swings in humidity because it will only vary, say, +/- 1/16th instead of gaining or losing a whole 1/8th.

    I got these calculations by referring to a Popular Woodworking article that turned up from a Google search. Probably other sources would yield differing answers.

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