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Thread: Baritone Laziness

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ripock View Post
    I never learned a single baritone chord. I always play mine like a tenor. And I think it would work in a group setting since it is a perfect interval removed from the rest of the group. Of course if the group's idea of playing music is all twenty of you playing the same chords at the same time, then it wouldn't work. But if the group could allow some harmonizing then it would work.
    Do you mean that you play a G chord while the tenor players are playing a C chord? I don't think you'll get a natural harmony this way. Together you will be playing C, E, G, B, and D notes.

  2. #12
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    Since I started on guitar, baritone comes naturally to me. For a while, I had to work at playing the C6 tuned uke.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Yates View Post
    Do you mean that you play a G chord while the tenor players are playing a C chord? I don't think you'll get a natural harmony this way. Together you will be playing C, E, G, B, and D notes.
    I had heard a voice coach say that singers, such as Simon and Garfunkel, achieve harmony by singing a fifth apart. I'll take your word that this doesn't apply to ukuleles.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ripock View Post
    I had heard a voice coach say that singers, such as Simon and Garfunkel, achieve harmony by singing a fifth apart. I'll take your word that this doesn't apply to ukuleles.
    I haven't listened to S&G much, so I don't know if they sing a fifth apart or not. It may be the case.
    However, singing a single melody line parallel a fifth apart, is different from playing chords a fifth apart.

    Tom Service had a great episode of The Listening Service on BBC Radio 3 some time ago. The intervals used in close harmony singing or singing in harmony in general, have changed over time. Older examples from polyphony have lots of octaves, then the gap became smaller by filling in the fifths. Later thirds and sixths became much more popular as intervals go.
    Now singing in fifths stands out (so that would be a great reason to do it in S&G's case) and sometimes feels weird.

    I don't know if you could listen to the programme via the BBC Sounds app in the US. However, I think that some of us might find this website interesting: https://www.britannica.com/art/harmony-music

  5. #15
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    I play my baritone using the songs I already know in "ukulele" tuning. I like the different sound - moodier, thoughtful.
    - Laura

    Martin, KoAloha, Brueko, Mele, Mainland, Outdoor, Kala, Enya, Harmony, Tempo, Globe, Shima, Vega, Silvertone, Kay, Luna, Vorson, Drewek, Zither Heaven, First Act

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