Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 31

Thread: Fountain Pens and Paper

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Darlington UK
    Posts
    1,044

    Default

    I had a brief fling with Fountain pens. Got a cheap Oxford fountain pen to start with and was soon eyeing up Lamys and drooling over Crosses and Parkers. Then I realised, I don't write to anyone. Who writes letters these days, I certainly don't, so after a period of practising my interest withered away. It was a passing fad. I would still like a nice green Parker ballpoint pen though.
    You don't stop playing when you get old. You get old when you stop playing

    Tanglewood TU13M concert
    Brunswick BU4-B baritone
    And a whole heap of other instruments...

    My Music Blog

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    U.K.
    Posts
    1,278

    Default

    It’s interesting to read about this now hobby and reflect that within my lifetime fountain pen users have gone from mainstream to niche. I used fountain pens at school and seem to remember that being allowed to use Biros was a step forward. At school my handwriting wasn’t the best and as a young adult I worked at improving that, people did get adversely judged if their handwriting wasn’t good. Somewhere I still have my fountain pens, they wouldn’t have been expensive (we had limited funds) but not so cheap as to function poorly. Perhaps I should sell them and let someone else gain pleasure from them. IIRC Parker were considered a good everyday pen and Waterman were up-market.

    The current generation of young adults often have very poor hand writing skills, what they produce can be quite hard to read. In contrast they’re a wizz with computer keyboards, entering text at a rapid rate; changing times require changing skills. A hand written note in ‘copper plate’ type writing is delightful to see but of a different time. For my own notes I use ball point pens and regard them as progress but, yes, there’s something about fountain pens that appeals in both artistic and nostalgic ways.
    Last edited by Graham Greenbag; 04-08-2021 at 09:53 PM.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Catskill Mountains, NY
    Posts
    7,845

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LarryS View Post
    Then I realised, I don't write to anyone.
    Since getting these pens, I'm forcing myself to write more and use the printer less.
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Proxima B
    Posts
    2,106

    Default

    . . . . , and today , cursive handwriting is a thing of the past ?
    " Anything larger than a soprano is cheating "
    " I'm no luthier but ,........"

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Derbyshire, UK
    Posts
    501

    Default

    In my line of work, fountain pens are still popular.

    They make you pause while you talk to your clients. This gives you time to think about the things you're writing and the questions you're about to ask.

    I never realised how important that was until covid happened and I went from visiting people at home filling out a paper form to typing everything up on a PC while interviewing them on a PC. My typed notes were rubbish - no quality!

    Fountain pen for anything thoughtful for me.
    Last edited by chris667; 04-09-2021 at 04:12 AM.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Posts
    125

    Default

    I still write thank you notes by hand. I use a fountain pen and good stationery because I enjoy the easy way the nib glides over the card stock. I've been doing this for years, but have noticed that since the turn of the century, people remark about the notes, sometimes years after receiving them. That really surprised me. Before the pandemic, I was visiting with an out of town friend. She went to her kitchen desk and pulled one of my thank you notes that I had written to her four years before. She saved it because it was so unusual to receive one.

    So I just keep cranking them out to express gratitude for gifts received, good service rendered, sweet kindnesses granted or just to let someone know they are special to me. That keeps those fountain pens in use.

    Bluesy.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    U.K.
    Posts
    1,278

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pukulele Pete View Post
    . . . . , and today , cursive handwriting is a thing of the past ?
    In today’s world written communication is virtually all via some electronic medium so handwriting, whether cursive or otherwise, is displaced by type. I’d expect a handwritten communication to have ‘joined-up’ letters, but that might be asking too much. Text might still be hand written during lessons, lectures and examinations but its use in the workplace is, I believe, relatively limited - not quite relegated to the past but not far from it. However there certainly still is a place for hand writing - it’s just right for some particular situations - but that place is a much smaller space than it used to be.

    Interestingly hand written items (like letters and cards) seem to carry more weight than printed items, somehow the skill and effort comes across and a good hand (or rather the products of one) is almost a work of art. Gosh, come to think of it, at one time ‘professionals’ looked at a person’s handwriting and made many character judgements from it. Signatures are currently hand written, typically in joined up writing. How long that will remain I do not know but to me a properly signed item (via a fountain pen or at least a ‘Biro’) has a weight or substance about it that an electronic signature can never have.
    Last edited by Graham Greenbag; 04-09-2021 at 10:54 PM.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    115

    Default

    I use a Pilot Metro most of the time. Pilot also has disposable fountain pens that I’m trying out to see how often I switch colors (turns out it’s pretty often to help keep my planner organized). I think a pack of six was about 13.00.

    As for notebooks, I’m not picky and use whatever’s handy. The only brand I avoid is Rite in the Rain who flat-out warn you their stuff doesn’t work with fountain pens.

    I use my pens quite a bit. I carry around a notebook during my normal day job and have to write down all sorts of notes (not to mention my planner) and I journal as well. I don’t write letters with it, though, because my hand tends to cramp after a while and my handwriting starts to get jagged and illegible. I do write a lot of letters, but they’re usually banged out on a typewriter.

    The only place I don’t bring my pen (usually) is on flights because of the pressure. If I do forget it in my pocket and bring it onboard, I find a trash can and empty the ink cartridge so it won’t blow up on me. ;-)

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Catskill Mountains, NY
    Posts
    7,845

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LukuleleStrings View Post
    I use a Pilot Metro most of the time. Pilot also has disposable fountain pens that I’m trying out to see how often I switch colors (turns out it’s pretty often to help keep my planner organized). I think a pack of six was about 13.00.
    Yes. I bought a pack a while ago.

    https://smile.amazon.com/Pilot-Varsi...rscience_os-20
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Darlington UK
    Posts
    1,044

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pukulele Pete View Post
    . . . . , and today , cursive handwriting is a thing of the past ?
    No cursive is standard writing
    You don't stop playing when you get old. You get old when you stop playing

    Tanglewood TU13M concert
    Brunswick BU4-B baritone
    And a whole heap of other instruments...

    My Music Blog

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •