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Thread: Desert Ironwood Fretboard

  1. #11
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    Fresh cut changes it quite a bit!
    desert-ironwood_PXL_20210418_140135276.jpg

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Clara View Post
    Fresh cut changes it quite a bit!
    desert-ironwood_PXL_20210418_140135276.jpg
    Beautiful! Is this the same wood that is called Ironwood in Hawaii? Also, same as Australian Pine in Florida???

  3. #13
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    It might make good saddles and nuts.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by eclipsme View Post
    Beautiful! Is this the same wood that is called Ironwood in Hawaii? Also, same as Australian Pine in Florida???
    I believe this is the stuff: https://www.wood-database.com/desert-ironwood/

  5. #15
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    New saw blade needed...😉
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  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by eclipsme View Post
    Beautiful! Is this the same wood that is called Ironwood in Hawaii? Also, same as Australian Pine in Florida???
    I'm pretty sure it is not. Range is limited to the Senora Desert The Southeast tip of CA, South West Corner of Arizona and Easter Baja.

    ronwood (Olneya tesota)

    Ironwood is a flowering tree from the legume family. The reason for its common name becomes immediately apparent if you ever tap the trunk with your knuckles. The wood is incredibly dense. This characteristic makes desert ironwood a very effective weapon. Native Americans in southern California used the ironwood for clubs and throwing sticks.

    The geographic range of this plant is interesting in that it perfectly overlaps with the reach of the Colorado section of the Sonoran desert. The Colorado Desert is the western portion of the Sonoran. As seen in the range map image, ironwood grows in a region adjacent to the Gulf of Mexico and then extends down into Baja, along the Vizcaino Desert border.

    Desert ironwood reaches a height of 35 feet and the trunk can assume a diameter of 2 feet. As in most Fabaceae species, the leaves are pinnately compound, in this case also greenish-blue. Flowers appear in late spring, giving way to a light-red seed pod.

    Uses for the desert ironwood tree

    The ironwood
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Michael Smith; 04-18-2021 at 08:34 PM.
    Michael Smith
    Goat Rock Ukulele
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  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Smith View Post
    I'm pretty sure it is not. Range is limited to the Senora Desert The Southeast tip of CA, South West Corner of Arizona and Easter Baja.

    ronwood (Olneya tesota)

    Ironwood is a flowering tree from the legume family. The reason for its common name becomes immediately apparent if you ever tap the trunk with your knuckles. The wood is incredibly dense. This characteristic makes desert ironwood a very effective weapon. Native Americans in southern California used the ironwood for clubs and throwing sticks.

    The geographic range of this plant is interesting in that it perfectly overlaps with the reach of the Colorado section of the Sonoran desert. The Colorado Desert is the western portion of the Sonoran. As seen in the range map image, ironwood grows in a region adjacent to the Gulf of Mexico and then extends down into Baja, along the Vizcaino Desert border.

    Desert ironwood reaches a height of 35 feet and the trunk can assume a diameter of 2 feet. As in most Fabaceae species, the leaves are pinnately compound, in this case also greenish-blue. Flowers appear in late spring, giving way to a light-red seed pod.

    Uses for the desert ironwood tree

    The ironwood
    Yes, this seems to be correct. Thanks.

  8. #18
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    I do need a new blade, I think. It's a highland wood slicer, which are nice blades, that don't stay sharp very long. I reset my guides for the second cut to the point that they were riding on the back of the gullet and a couple of the bearings were spinning at all times during the cut. If I wasn't pushing hard against the fence, causing the left bearing to spin, then the right bearing immediately started spinning instead. The result was a much cleaner cut than the first, though.
    PXL_20210419_122319932.jpg

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by eclipsme View Post
    Beautiful! Is this the same wood that is called Ironwood in Hawaii? Also, same as Australian Pine in Florida???
    Australian Pine (in Florida) or "ironwood" in Hawaii is Casuarina, of which there are three species in Florida. I think that the two most common Florida species are in Hawaii. Considered an invasive species in Florida. Casuarina equisetifolia grows as single trees, C. glauca makes dense casuarina-only stands because it grows from root sprouts. Glauca is the really invasive casuarina in Florida. Both a very hard wood, with few pores. Makes great fingerboards and back & sides, much like ebony. Not commercially available because it has a reputation for twisting and checking when drying, but I have found that quarter-sawn billets behave rather well. Bring your carbide-tipped bandsaw however.

    All three of these have casuarina fingerboards and the middle one has casuarina back & sides,
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by jupiteruke; 04-19-2021 at 04:42 AM.

  10. #20
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    This thread got me thinking about some ironwood I have here. I probably haven't seen it in 30 years or more. somebody gave it to me I used it on the first instrument I ever build which was an F5. I didn't know any better and I still have the mandolin. I made the neck out of it and I still have the mando. I also remember cutting the stuff


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