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Thread: Your Favorite Ukulele Woods Not Koa, Mahogany, Spruce or Cedar?

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    62

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    I'll go with sinker redwood only because thats what I ended up with on my tenor. I actually prefer it without the dark stripes that it is known for. For back and side woods, I have Australian Blackwood on this uke and African Blackwood on my Classical Guitar. I'm not sure if it would sound any different with rosewood or another wood, but I'm happy with it.
    Here's a stock image of my tenor
    IMG_2097.jpg
    I'Iwi Tenor
    Graziano Baritone
    Koaloha Concert
    Kamaka Pineapple

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    62

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    every time I post a pic on here its either huge or a tumbnail. ah well
    I'Iwi Tenor
    Graziano Baritone
    Koaloha Concert
    Kamaka Pineapple

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Derbyshire, UK
    Posts
    520

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    One of my favourite ukes is made of lacewood and holly.

    I like the way it plays and because of my friendship with its builder. I believe it was the last one he ever made before his retirement.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Sparta, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    3,148

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    I edited my earlier reply and added a photo.

    I saw and listened to a Pete Howlett tenor recently that was made from the English Yew tree. Nice sound to it.

    A great resource for ideas is the UkuleleFriend.com website. The Ukulele Archives has hundreds of mouthwatering exceptional ukuleles made by some of the best luthiers in the world. Lots of different wood combinations and designs are there for inspiration. Even sound clips for many of them.
    Last edited by Kenn2018; 04-25-2021 at 11:16 AM.
    There is a subtle yet profound difference between the learning of something and the knowing of that thing.
    You can learn by reading, but you don't begin to know until you begin to try to do.

    --Lou Churchill, Plane & Pilot Magazine

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1,555

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    My best uke has a King Billy pine (athrotaxis selaginoides) top with silver wattle (acacia dealbata) back and sides. My second-best one is mango.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    2,010

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    My Brueko walnut soprano purchased here in the Marketplace is lovely to look at and to play. Mine has the walnut stripe down the maple fretboard.
    - Laura

    Martin, KoAloha, Brueko, Mele, Mainland, Outdoor, Kala, Enya, Harmony, Tempo, Globe, Shima, Vega, Silvertone, Kay, Luna, Vorson, Drewek, Zither Heaven, First Act

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by kohanmike View Post
    Spalted of any kind. I have a spalted mango with flame mango made for me by Bruce Wei Arts in Vietnam, very nice out of the ordinary design.




    This is Michael Kohan in Los Angeles, Beverly Grove near the Beverly Center
    8 tenor cutaway ukes, 4 acoustic bass ukes, 10 solid body bass ukes, 14 mini electric bass guitars (Total: 36)

    Donate to The Ukulele Kids Club, they provide ukuleles to children in hospital music therapy programs. www.theukc.org
    Member The CC Strummers: www.youtube.com/user/CCStrummers/video, www.facebook.com/TheCCStrummers
    Is this some kind of resonator ukes? Its really different looking.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    McDonough, GA
    Posts
    4,645

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    For tops, I'm drawn to Spruce (Red, Sitka, Engelmann). I've had spotty luck with redwood and cedar.

    Back and sides, I think it matters less as long as it is a hard dense wood. Rosewood and Mahogany are on a few of my instruments. But there are so many good choices (Ziricote, Colobolo, Katalox, Myrtle, Maple, Walnut, Sycamore, ....). Surprisingly, Mango has also worked out well on a couple ukes for me, as well.
    -Hodge
    Humble strummer of fine ukes.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Posts
    389

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    Since many regular posters answered the question, I have summarized the answers below. I only took the first wood each mentioned. Here are the number of times for each wood:

    4 mango
    4 acacia
    3 walnut
    2 sycamore
    2 myrtle
    2 redwood
    1 maple
    1 London plane
    1 cherry
    1 cocobolo
    1 lacewood
    1 King Billy pine

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    MN metro area
    Posts
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    I'll throw in. Outside of the woods to be eliminated in the original post, I have an Ohana all-solid (sinker) redwood/rosewood, an Ohana all-solid acacia, a Rebel all-solid mango and a Bonanza all-solid cherry. I think the one whose sound separates itself from the others the most would be the mango. I haven't played it enough to get a real bead on the sound yet but my initial impression is that it has a dryer, more woody sound, not quite as chime-y. They all sound great and there are really no stark/big differences in the sounds when played side by side. I'd call the differences subtle. I'd reach for any one of them just as soon as I would any of the others. If I had to pick a favorite, I'd probably go with the acacia. (Which also happens to be the most pretty/handsome of the four.)
    Last edited by mikelz777; 04-27-2021 at 07:10 AM.
    Money can't buy happiness but it can buy a uke which is basically the same thing.

    Ukes are a lot like potato chips. It's hard to stop with just one!

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