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Thread: Intonation problem - on one string.

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill1 View Post
    Look at the diameters of the strings not the brand name on the packet.

    I am going to go out on a limb and suggest that the new string is not the same diameter as the old string, and that the slot in the nut is too high or to low for the new string.

    Often buying ukulele string sets is about diameter and materials. If you change the string diameters too much, you will need a new set-up.
    Thanks for that suggestion. In this case I think I've narrowed it down to the actual string (see my post just before this). But that's darn good advice for future string changes!

  2. #12
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    Well, the bottom line and good news is, strings are disposable. As players, we're not supposed to worry about the cost of strings. We just act like they're free.
    "The sole cause of all human misery is the inability of people
    to sit quietly in their rooms." - Blaise Pascal, 1670

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wineshop View Post
    Man I tried that very thing, and when those notes are in tune with each other, the open E is out.
    Oh, OK then. How are you going about tuning the open strings? If you're using an electronic tuner, try another one. If you're tuning by ear, then use this procedure:
    1. Set your G string to the pitch you like for G. It will be your anchor for the other strings;
    2. Tune your A string to the G string, 2nd fret;
    3. Tune your E string 3rd fret to your G string;
    4. Tune your C string 7th fret to your G string;
    5. Check your open C string against your A 3rd fret;
    6. Check your open C string against your E 8th fret.

    Let us know how that works out.
    "The sole cause of all human misery is the inability of people
    to sit quietly in their rooms." - Blaise Pascal, 1670

  4. #14
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    It does sound like you've narrowed it down to a bad string, and swapping was a good check.

    You mentioned your success rate with strings on the first page. I haven't kept track but anecdotally I would say that I've had a much higher "bad string rate" with uke strings than any other instrument type.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwizum View Post
    It does sound like you've narrowed it down to a bad string, and swapping was a good check.

    You mentioned your success rate with strings on the first page. I haven't kept track but anecdotally I would say that I've had a much higher "bad string rate" with uke strings than any other instrument type.


    Ahh. That's a good piece of information to have. I guess moving forward I'll order multiple string sets just in case. Because until I get the replacement this thing is unplayable. I tried to just play through it and ignore the intonation problem ... can't do it! (or .. just buy a second uke?? Seems a good enough reason for me).

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwizum View Post
    It does sound like you've narrowed it down to a bad string, and swapping was a good check.

    You mentioned your success rate with strings on the first page. I haven't kept track but anecdotally I would say that I've had a much higher "bad string rate" with uke strings than any other instrument type.
    I would add to that in that of all the strings I’ve had intonation problems with the bulk of them have been Nylon. To be fair the Nylon strings that I’ve happened on in the past haven’t necessarily been high end ones but the experience still stands true.

    As for Ernie Ball, I don’t doubt for one moment that they make high quality Nylon strings, but IMHO Nylgut and fluorocarbon just seem to be so much more reliable than any Nylon that I’ve tried. I’m not anti-Nylon and would happily trial a set to see how they work out but success wouldn’t be guaranteed. To my mind there’s scant if any advantage in Nylon so it’s almost a case of why take the risk of such failure? Yet I have and doubtless will do so at some time again, ‘cause when it works properly Nylon’s good.

    Edit. I’m inclined to think that Nylon is more subject to inconsistencies both within the material and string manufacture than Nylgut and Fluorocarbon. Rectified Nylon is ground to size and the need for that process indicates to me that as manufactured the line diameter can be quite variable. Not all Nylon strings are rectified so some must be supplied as extruded (so you get what you get), IIRC only one manufacturer claims laser control of the extrusion process and hence very close diameter control using that alternative procedure.

    A good tip from Chris below and it sometimes works on other string materials too.
    Last edited by Graham Greenbag; 04-29-2021 at 06:43 AM. Reason: Additional detail added

  7. #17
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    In my experience, this is usually down to a poor tolerance to the string itself.

    What has worked for me in the past is untying the string then retying it the other way round (so the nut end is now at the bridge and vice versa). If your intonation is OK after that, you don't need to worry about strings for a while.

    You have nothing to lose!

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris667 View Post
    In my experience, this is usually down to a poor tolerance to the string itself.

    What has worked for me in the past is untying the string then retying it the other way round (so the nut end is now at the bridge and vice versa). If your intonation is OK after that, you don't need to worry about strings for a while.

    You have nothing to lose!


    Darn good idea! Trying that tonight. Thanks!!

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris667 View Post
    In my experience, this is usually down to a poor tolerance to the string itself.

    What has worked for me in the past is untying the string then retying it the other way round (so the nut end is now at the bridge and vice versa). If your intonation is OK after that, you don't need to worry about strings for a while.

    You have nothing to lose!

    Son of a *%^$#, that worked. You, my friend, are a steely eyed missile man! Never in 40 years of music have I flipped a string around. I sure appreciate it. And VegasGeorge - the same, bro. Thanks for all your advice.

  10. #20
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    Dang, that's a new one on me too.
    Ukulele:
    Iriguchi Tenor "Weeble" - A, WoU Clarity
    Blue Star 19" baritone Konablaster - DGBE
    Cocobolo 16" SC#1-gCEA, SC SLMU
    Ono #42 19" baritone, Ab, LW
    Imua iET-Bb, M600
    Covered Bridge CLN pineapple - Eb cuatro, SC XLL
    Rogue bari
    Bonanza super tenor, cFAD SC LHU
    Kala KSLNG, Eb SC XLU
    Hanson 5-string tenor, dGCEA
    Bonanza SLN GCEA
    Southern Cross concert GCEA
    Guitars:
    Jupiter #47, G, TI CF127
    Pelem, B reentrant
    Jupiter #71, A, UG1

    !Flukutronic!

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