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Thread: What instrument for a beginner?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    331

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    I have a flea for sale in the market place.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Another Ukulele View Post
    I agree with the ‘proof of concept’ statement. My first Uke was a $20 ‘toy’. I had fun ‘playing’ with it so I graduated up.

    So unless you are certain you want to invest, go inexpensive. If you KNOW you want to really delve into this wonderful instrument, spend the money and purchase something that won’t frustrate you.
    I disagree. Get something that won't frustrate you from day one.
    Kanile'a K2-T Premium Koa Tenor
    Kala KA-ZTP-CTG-CE Cedar Ziricote Tenor
    Risa Uke Solid Tenor
    Flight Diana Soundwave Concert
    Enya X1 Concert HPL
    Enya Nova U Mini Soprano
    Ohana TPK-25G Sopranino

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kaelrie View Post
    I disagree. Get something that won't frustrate you from day one.
    I agree with Kaelre's disagreement, especially when you do the math. For my re-entrant uke needs I ended up with a $2200 Kamaka custom.

    I know a lot of people are like OMG!

    But think of how most people do it: a $50 crappy uke, then a $100 slightly less crappy Kala, then a jump up to a $200 Ocsar Schmidt, then a jump up to a $400 Cordoba, then up to $600 Pono, then up to the Kamaka.

    What is the math? 50+100+200+400+600+2200=3550

    Or you could save up ( or even pay in monthly installments) and spend $2200 for a Kamaka. That's a savings of $1350.

    So, the math dictates that you shouldn't pay for a succession of sh*tty made-in-China assembly-line ukes...and then buy a good ukulele; you should save one or two thousand dollars and just pay for a hawaiian ukulele.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
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    Denmark
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    Quote Originally Posted by ripock View Post
    I agree with Kaelre's disagreement, especially when you do the math. For my re-entrant uke needs I ended up with a $2200 Kamaka custom.

    I know a lot of people are like OMG!

    But think of how most people do it: a $50 crappy uke, then a $100 slightly less crappy Kala, then a jump up to a $200 Ocsar Schmidt, then a jump up to a $400 Cordoba, then up to $600 Pono, then up to the Kamaka.

    What is the math? 50+100+200+400+600+2200=3550

    Or you could save up ( or even pay in monthly installments) and spend $2200 for a Kamaka. That's a savings of $1350.

    So, the math dictates that you shouldn't pay for a succession of sh*tty made-in-China assembly-line ukes...and then buy a good ukulele; you should save one or two thousand dollars and just pay for a hawaiian ukulele.
    I agree on not going too cheap to begin with, but in your math you are forgetting that a lot of people leave it ar their crappy uke, or find themselves quite happy with $300 uke.
    Take into account that a lot of people can't afford $2000, or $500 for that matter, and are not going to start a saving account of they don't even know if they like ukulele.
    But I am happy for you that you found joy enough on ukulele to go all the way for the best!

    For a beginner I would just suggest that of you can afford a $200 ukulele (or whatever the amount is for you) without sweat, dont get one for $50 because you like a good deal. By getting something a little better there is less chance you will need an upgrade, and if you upgrade, more chance you will keep it as a beater for camping etc. And it is surprisingly easy to sell second hand ukuleles, even low end ones, if you don't like it.
    Playing:
    Anuenue AMM tenor - Magic Fluke Koa Tenor - Cocobolo concert - Kamaka Tiki concert - Cort concert - Ohana LN soprano.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
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    I don't want to be a recrudescence to this thread, so I'll just say one more thing and depart. When I was a boy I paid $23.89 a month for a flute. It seems that I was paying that for years. So, yes, I was probably paying a lot of interest, but at least I was able to play my flute. I mention this in passing because I have seen in some of the big sites (Elderly, Sweetwater, Reverb) that they offer financing through Affirm or some other permutation of Synchrony. Accordingly, if you set your heart on a $500 uke, you can get it now and pay it over time. I'll leave it at that.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Arizona
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    3 days and 25 posts later, the OP hasn't checked back on this thread...
    Just Play

    Sopranos: 1st uke, Lanikai soprano LU-11 - Aquilas | 30's Martin style 0 - Martins
    Concerts: Kanile'a K-2 CP - Living Water | Islander AC-4 - Living Water | Waverly Street banjolele - Worth Browns
    Tenor: Martin Iz - Living Water low G
    UBass: Kala FS2 (fretless) - Pahoehoe

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2021
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    100

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    Quote Originally Posted by UkerDanno View Post
    3 days and 25 posts later, the OP hasn't checked back on this thread...

    OP frozen in front of computer with decision paralysis

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2021
    Location
    Grafton, Wisconsin
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    Good discussion even if the OP is sidetracked, frozen or incapacitated. Very interesting discussion that I am sure several people are happy to read.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Redmond, WA
    Posts
    747

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    Quote Originally Posted by donboody View Post
    OP frozen in front of computer with decision paralysis
    Or done talking and now playing!

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    SF Bay Area California
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    Quote Originally Posted by rainbow21 View Post
    I am always a bit surprised that there is so much feedback on going cheaper to save money on a first ukulele. I would look for one that sounds good and plays well first. Most "beginner" ukes do not fall in this category since most of those that get one want to "upgrade" once they decide they like it.

    I would consider a budget around $200 and then call Mim (or another excellent seller) and give her the parameters of what you are looking for and your budget. Let her guide you to a good choice. You should get a good instrument that plays well to give you the better chance of success.
    I think this may be because having your instrument out of it's case and always there is a key to playing more. I would never leave my tasty ukes on the couch, but the Makala concert I have gets lots of abuse because it gets left wherever and never sees the inside of a gig bag. As a result it is always ready for a short session with no forethought. I grew up respecting instruments and being super careful with them, but now I afford that respect only to the nicer stuff!
    Too chicken to install strap buttons...

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