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Thread: A Tool You Would Normally Not Purchase but Glad You Did

  1. #1
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    Default A Tool You Would Normally Not Purchase but Glad You Did

    Curious if anybody has purchased a tool that normally you would pass on because of it being too expensive etc. but you purchased anyway and are glad you did?

    For me it was the Nut and Saddle Sander from Stew Mac. At nearly $200 it was something I could not justify. A couple years back I received some cash gifts for my birthday and saw that the sander was on sale. I think I got it for $150 (which is still pricey). I had no problem dealing with nuts and saddles with sandpaper on glass and small pieces of wood to keep things square etc. but I'm glad I sprung for this tool. Well made and it allows me to prepare the pieces a little faster even after fiddling with adjusting for the height etc.

    IMG_0735.jpg

    What ya got?
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  2. #2
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    Yep, that is one of those tools. I call it a roller skate and pretty much thought it was an expensive joke until I saw one in person. I bought one and it's a brilliant tool for saddles, especially if you install pickups. Don't use it as much for nuts, but I use it on every saddle and would buy another one if I somehow lost it. How could I lose it. Well, I once had a visitor with a small boy. I was pretty engaged with the Dad, and when he left my favorite finger plane was gone! Kids will be kids.-Bob

  3. #3

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    I bought one of those for around $75 on eBay. It was a knock off I guess but extremely well made.
    Michael Smith
    Goat Rock Ukulele
    www.goatrockukulele.com

  4. #4
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    I always saw how useful a thing like that could be but looked at the price and went hahahahahhaha no way. Then I thought I would make my own with a wheel bearings and wood and screws and realized it wasn't that simple. Never did get one made. But I'm still not payin' that price. Maybe I should reconsider because we all know how sanding starts to cause that radius in things...

  5. #5
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    nut files. I used welding nozzle cleaners initially but so much easier with the correct files.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by sequoia View Post
    I always saw how useful a thing like that could be but looked at the price and went hahahahahhaha no way. Then I thought I would make my own with a wheel bearings and wood and screws and realized it wasn't that simple. Never did get one made. But I'm still not payin' that price. Maybe I should reconsider because we all know how sanding starts to cause that radius in things...
    That's funny. Until I read your post this morning I had totally forgotten that I actually did make one at first. It did work good for longer pieces of saddle before cutting to final width. It didn't work as well for shorter pieces/nuts as the wood would flex in on the ends and bow out in the center. If that part was reinforced with some steel to stiffen it up it might work better.

    If you are interested in making a new piece for it I will send it your way. Just send me a PM with your snail mail address and I will shoot it off to you.

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikeyb2 View Post
    nut files. I used welding nozzle cleaners initially but so much easier with the correct files.
    Agreed. Welding nozzle cleaners work in a pinch but much better with the proper files.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dominator View Post
    Curious if anybody has purchased a tool that normally you would pass on because of it being too expensive etc. but you purchased anyway and are glad you did?

    For me it was the Nut and Saddle Sander from Stew Mac. At nearly $200 it was something I could not justify. A couple years back I received some cash gifts for my birthday and saw that the sander was on sale. I think I got it for $150 (which is still pricey). I had no problem dealing with nuts and saddles with sandpaper on glass and small pieces of wood to keep things square etc. but I'm glad I sprung for this tool. Well made and it allows me to prepare the pieces a little faster even after fiddling with adjusting for the height etc.


    What ya got?
    I have that and yes it was a good investment. One thing I can't figure out is how to use that little insert clip....it just doesn't make sense to me. I have sent in a question about it to Stewmac but they never responded (which is unusual for them). Any guidance from you would be appreciated!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by taylordb View Post
    I have that and yes it was a good investment. One thing I can't figure out is how to use that little insert clip....it just doesn't make sense to me. I have sent in a question about it to Stewmac but they never responded (which is unusual for them). Any guidance from you would be appreciated!
    Not sure why it was designed that way but the insert clip needs to be removed when working on nuts and because of the depression that exists when the insert is removed it should be installed when working on the longer saddle pieces. When the insert is in place the adjustment bolts will hit the top of it and will not go in far enough to make contact with the nut.

    Again, not sure why they designed it that way...I think it would have worked just fine without the milled out depression.
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  10. #10
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    Thanks so much! That makes sense.

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