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Thread: Removing small dents

  1. #1

    Default Removing small dents

    Hello Guys,

    i have a Ukulele that is overall in good condition, but has some annoying marks on the back.

    I tried to take a picture but its impossible to make it visible on a photo. (maybe because of the gloss finish).

    There are a few small scrachtes, but they are not the problem. The back is full of very small little dots, that are a bit deeper than the rest of the laquer. You just see them in the right light/angle, but you can see them very clearly then.

    I wonder where are they coming from and how i can get rid of them?

    I would try to sand, but i think this wouldnt remove them, just change the appearance. I also made the experience that the laquer gets more bright and a little bit "milky" when i tried to sand other ukes.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sheffield, England
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    168

    Default

    Is the back made of an open grained wood? Are you talking about where the lacquer has sunk into the grain? A picture would help.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Catskill Mountains, NY
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    Default

    Something I've seen many times online is using a damp cloth and an iron. I've never tried it, but I'm tempted to dent some random wood in the garage and give it a try. Of course, I'll have to locate the iron.

    https://www.familyhandyman.com/artic...oth%20is%20dry.
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Woodland Hills, CA
    Posts
    82

    Default

    Jerry, this method does work to some extent, but if there is a finish on the instrument it may not work.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by surfink View Post
    Jerry, this method does work to some extent, but if there is a finish on the instrument it may not work.
    Yes, that's definitely a concern. I'm leaving the few dents that I have in mine.
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  6. #6

    Default

    I guess steaming wouldnt help, since the dents are not in the wood but in the laquer.


    Sunken Laquer is a good idea, that could be. Never tought about that. The Top is Spruce and has zero dents.


    You cant see the dents in my picture, but the wood itself.

    IMG_20210514_085207.jpg
    IMG_20210514_085339.jpg

    The wood is java rosewood.
    Last edited by Joralin; 05-14-2021 at 09:18 AM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Little River, California
    Posts
    2,778

    Default

    Personally if that was mine I would live with it. Think of it as giving the instrument character. What I think I'm seeing (hard to tell) is some contraction and shrinkage of the lacquer over time or perhaps there was an incomplete pore fill along some of the grain lines prior to to applying the finish or a little of both. Anyway, to get rid of them would probably require a refinish which costs $$$.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sheffield, England
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    168

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    Looks like shrinkage to me, many pore filling techniques do shrink over time. You either live with it or refinish the instrument. Helps if you know what the finish is to start with. This is one advantage of French polish - very easy to refinish when required. Personally I don't mind having grain visible. It's a ukulele made of wood. Why everyone tries their hardest to make it look like plastic I will never understand.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Little River, California
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red Cliff View Post
    It's a ukulele made of wood. Why everyone tries their hardest to make it look like plastic I will never understand.
    Guilty as charged! It seems that people that buy my instruments want a shiny, smooth finish. Shiny sells and I do enjoy getting that smooooth finish. But I agree, sometimes I think we take the humble ukulele, made of wood and try to make little shiny guitars. A tasteful mat finish with a good quality tung oil looks great, but bigger bucks are in the shiny. A little sad I agree.

  10. #10

    Default

    Thank you guys.

    I know these "sinkings" are not a big deal, but i like to have my stuff in "perfect" condition. I also like to make some small reapairs myself if possible.

    Do you know any "gap fillers" or tricks to refinish my gloss finish?

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