Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 15 of 15

Thread: Removing small dents

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Catskill Mountains, NY
    Posts
    8,137

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Joralin View Post
    Thank you guys.

    I know these "sinkings" are not a big deal, but i like to have my stuff in "perfect" condition. I also like to make some small reapairs myself if possible.

    Do you know any "gap fillers" or tricks to refinish my gloss finish?
    If the uke builders on this forum haven't offered good ideas, there probably aren't any. : (
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!
    https://www.catskillukulelegroup.com/

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Stockton on Tees..North East UK.
    Posts
    5,749

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Joralin View Post
    Thank you guys.

    I know these "sinkings" are not a big deal, but i like to have my stuff in "perfect" condition.
    Then when you buy another , dont play it, just put it in a glass case and hang it on the wall.
    http://ukulele-innovation.tripod.com ebay i/d squarepeg_3000 Email timmsken@hotmail.com

    If you can believe that moving images and sound, can fly through empty space across the universe and be seen and heard on a box in your living room ?.. then you can believe in anything.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    774

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Joralin View Post
    Do you know any "gap fillers" or tricks to refinish my gloss finish?
    There are no cunning tricks with a high gloss finish!

    Anything which just fills the "dents" will refract light differently from the original finish. So you'll see where the dents were, even if you don't see them as dents.

    A high gloss finish works by having a uniform film of the same finish across the whole surface. Anything which isn't that won't look like you want.

    A suitably skilled luthier could refinish the back and bring it to the high gloss you want, though after a few years that might shrink back too. But it would probably look different from the high gloss on the sides, so you'd better have those done at the same time.

    This is one of the reasons why I don't try to achieve a mirror gloss on the ukes I make. There are other reasons, including that I haven't the patience and possibly not the skill to achieve it ...

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,139

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sequoia View Post
    Guilty as charged! It seems that people that buy my instruments want a shiny, smooth finish. Shiny sells and I do enjoy getting that smooooth finish. But I agree, sometimes I think we take the humble ukulele, made of wood and try to make little shiny guitars. A tasteful mat finish with a good quality tung oil looks great, but bigger bucks are in the shiny. A little sad I agree.
    Shiny has always been popular, probably ever since man discovered shiny things like gold. Sadly there is always a price to pay in that it makes for a less interesting surface i.e. it's just one homogeneous surface. A new Steinway piano is a pretty impressive object to look at, an incredibly shiny mirror black finish but it can only hold your attention for a few seconds. Visually there just isn't enough happening for the eye and the mind to maintain interest. I decided long ago that I was never going to finish my instruments by taking them through to optical purity, what I term 'polishing the lens'. I did that a couple of times and ended up removing that type of gloss after just a few days. That's when I sought a compromise, gloss but not with the glass hard look. I finish with the french polishing pad done in very deliberate overlapping straight lines. No abrasives. This is enough to put micro lines into the finish, a slightly more friendly looking gloss. The real difficulty (and it is difficult) is getting it to look even all across the back or top plates. Anything that ends up 'patchy' is going to look pretty amateurish. It's not that different to doing a scraper finish on spruce. We all know that it results in ridges. If you ended up with even looking ridges all across the plates it makes for an interesting finish, you also get texture. It's so difficult to get it to look even though. Far easier to just go through the sanding grits.

  5. #15

    Default

    Okay, seems that it's better to leave it as it is.

    Thanks for your answeres and opinions guys.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •