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Thread: Sell Me On Low G

  1. #11
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    Mar 2021
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    Thanks for the replies everybody. I guess there is a little more to it than I thought, specifically if I'm a picker or a strummer. I'm both, by the way. I pick more than I strum.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    Chicago
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    If you play melody as well as chords, those extra 5 notes can be mighty handy. As ripock says, you get more scales in more keys. Also it's nice to have the option of not playing so high on the fretboard. If you've got a high-G and want to play in the key of C, you're either going to have to fudge some notes or jump to the high octave, which might not be the sound you want.

    I'm more of a chords + vocals player. I like low-G for blues, folk and country songs. Travis picking does work with high-G but the sound ain't the same. My voice (I sing soprano, play concert) benefits from a little extra support on the low end.

    FWIW, I prefer high-G for jazz and the Great American Songbook. I think everybody should try both high and low G. Even if you ultimately decide you don't like low G for any application, it will have been an interesting experiment and you'll probably learn some new things about the instrument and your own particular preferences. Besides, changing a string is cheaper than buying another uke

  3. #13

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    Low G or High G? I believe the correct answer is BOTH! I have three Tenors: two are in High G, and one is in Low G. Some songs or styles sound better in one or the other, but I'm happy to have the option. That being said, I'm primarily a guitarist, so if I could only have one Uke it would be in High G. As noted above, it's easy to buy a single Low G string and try it on your High G Uke to see if you like it.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
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    USA
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    IMHO - low-G is not tremendously useful unless you are playing fingerstyle. If you do like fingerstyle, here is a good comparison of high-G vs low-G:

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Portland OR
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    What a fun fun video. Thanks for sharing.

    I'm a fingerpicker. Love, love low G. I have three tenors and a soprano and concert. At one point they were all tuned low G - even the soprano. However, once I got my KoAloha tenor, none of them could compete with it as a low G. So today, my soprano, concert, and one tenor are Hi G. The other tenor I have set up with Baritone tuning. It is the best Baritone I've ever played. I found myself either playing it or the KoAloha. It's very hard to put either of them down.

    Find what speaks to you, and go with it.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2021
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    Quote Originally Posted by UkerDanno View Post
    Just get a Fremont soloist low G string, It's just a few bucks and an easy change. I'm not a passionate low G-er, but I do have low G on my Tenor. It works fine for playing a lot of the old rock songs, etc.
    Is it common that the low G would be wound and the rest of my strings would be nylgut or nylon (not wound, is what I'm saying)?

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
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    Canada Prairies, brrr ....
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    Quote Originally Posted by donboody View Post
    Is it common that the low G would be wound and the rest of my strings would be nylgut or nylon (not wound, is what I'm saying)?
    There are many different types of low G options and the majority will be wound. Some fluorocarbon sets have plain low G of the same material, but density of nylon or Nylgut is too low, so usually use wound string with same core material. If they are silver wound the windings may not last long. A more durable alternative are Aquila red which have similar sound and are my preference.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    NorCal
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    I finally set up one with lowG last year. It is okay and there are times that I prefer it to high G but never a necessity and I prefer high G for most of my chord/melody songs.

    Here are a few considerations:

    Low G wound strings can really really boom out and overpower the other strings. This is my experience so I went to a local shop and they sold me a single fluorocarbon one for $4 that they use and took off a large spool. This worked well.

    An unwound low G is a fatter string than the wounds. This may or may not necessitate filing the nut slot a little so it seats better. Can happen with wound, but they are a little thinner.

    Keep your high G string in case you dislike it and want to switch back. Or you can just replace all with a new set.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2021
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    Quote Originally Posted by merlin666 View Post
    There are many different types of low G options and the majority will be wound. Some fluorocarbon sets have plain low G of the same material, but density of nylon or Nylgut is too low, so usually use wound string with same core material. If they are silver wound the windings may not last long. A more durable alternative are Aquila red which have similar sound and are my preference.
    I guess my question is, do I need to buy all new strings if I'm currently using nylgut or will it sound just find using 3 nylgut and 1 would Low G?

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
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    414

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    Your mileage may vary, but in general it'll sound fine.

    Most brands that sell both high g and low g string sets for the same product don't do anything different except for the g string itself.

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