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Thread: Finding uncommon chords

  1. #11
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    Ah, my interpretation was correct then. It's a good sounding chord, on it's own. What chord sequence would you use it in?

    John Colter

  2. #12
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    Jul 2021
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    There is a second instance of the chord shape on the seventh fret E plus G. E open string G open string. Csus2 second position. Try a strumming pattern of 4-3-1 Ghost Cord 4-3 ending on Csus2 second position 1. Back to D on fifth fret as rhythm.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ubulele View Post
    0405 is not a Csus2 because it has the 3rd (doubled, in fact) as well as the 2nd/9th, so the 2nd doesn't replace the 3rd. I would call it an incomplete Cadd9--incomplete because it's missing the 5th. A way to play it that includes the 5th would be 0435 (also 0205). Csus2 could be played 0233 (or 5233, or 5785).

    Your second instance (if you mean 0707) is just a minor 3rd dyad (of E's and G's) that might be used for a rootless C triad but decidedly not for Csus2.
    0405 is a straight Em7.Examples of Csus2 are 0035 or 0233.
    Last edited by merlin666; 07-13-2021 at 01:07 PM.

  4. #14
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    Jul 2021
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    Third fret 0 0 G 0 fifth fret 0 0 0 D is second position Csus2 by a lot of chord guides. The phantom “ ghost chord “ is fourth fret 0 E 0 0 and fifth fret 0 0 0 D. The chord doesn’t appear on the baritone either but sounds just as cool.
    Last edited by JnApple; 07-13-2021 at 04:01 PM. Reason: Wrong note.

  5. #15
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    9DC44D90-21BB-46A7-B304-BD54792B6C9B.jpg
    The “ ghost “ chord.

  6. #16
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    This would be G E E D on a standard tuned uke
    Depending on low g vs high G and maybe context, this would come off sounding like either G6 or Em7 though it is missing the B note of either.

    I like to use the GuitarToolkit app on the iPad for figuring out this kind of stuff.
    Ukulele:
    Iriguchi Tenor "Weeble" - A, WoU Clarity
    Blue Star 19" baritone Konablaster - DGBE
    Cocobolo 16" SC#1-gCEA, SC SLMU
    Ono #42 19" baritone, Ab, LW
    Imua iET-Bb, M600
    Covered Bridge CLN pineapple - Eb cuatro, SC XLL
    Rogue bari
    Bonanza super tenor, cFAD SC LHU
    Kala KSLNG, Eb SC XLU
    Hanson 5-string tenor, LW dGBEA
    Southern Cross concert GCEA
    Guitars:
    Jupiter #47, G, TI CF127
    Pelem, B reentrant
    Jupiter #71, E cuatro TI/Oasis

    !Flukutronic!

  7. #17
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    Jul 2021
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    B44BABC8-14A6-40D9-89AA-C4FAD839C9B6.jpg seventh fret “ ghost chord “ not as powerful being up the neck as first instance on fourth fret and fifth fret. E 0 G 0.

  8. #18
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    Apr 2019
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    Wisconsin, central USA
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    A very helpful app ( iOS for me ) is named " U-Cord " It allows you to see and hear a cord and its' various shapes by selecting the cord name OR tapping on the string/fret location, which returns the name of the cord. The upgrade option allows you to "save" cords and patterns.
    KoAloha KSM-10 Pikake ::: Kanile'a Islander MAPG-4-C ::: Kala KA-SSTU-TE ::: Opio LongNeck Concert Acacia ::: KoAloha Silver Anniversary KCM-00 #060 ::: Antica Ukuleleria Concert Libero ::: Kanile'a K-1 Concert DLX ::: Pono Tenor electric Mango Deluxe TE-MD-G ::: Satin Pono Mango Concert MGC :::

  9. #19
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    Jul 2021
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    I have that and the baritone one for my Flea ( gives it a haunting sound ). Have three apps, multiple books, and had some great feedback from those here that have a deep knowledge of string theory. What always annoys me about chords are the dead string ones or the pretzel fingering ones, and the cool ones like Fifth Fret D and Fourth Fret E with open strings are not found. I use one that I called the Twang Chord but it is known. Thanks. Twang Chord Gb13-5-9 Third Fret C open D#/Eb open.
    Last edited by JnApple; 07-19-2021 at 11:38 AM.

  10. #20
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    Jul 2021
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    Found the Hal Leonard Ukulele Chord Finder book. It actually features 5 chords, something the u-chord doesn’t. I will keep searching on the ukulele and across the galaxy to see if the chords exist or just note it as two notes connected, to go along with any modified chords I play. Thank you each and all for the feedback.

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