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Thread: Ukulele Bridge Placement

  1. #11
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    I don't see the advantage of using a moveable bridge/saddle. It is not difficult to measure the correct location for the bridge/saddle unit, and then glue it in place.

    You can never achieve absolutely perfect intonation on a ukulele, or on any fretted instrument. It is all a mass of compromises. It is the player that makes the instrument sound good.

    Ukantor.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moore Bettah Ukuleles View Post
    Matt, I only started that "Rocket Science" thread because some people here have lost sight of what we are doing here, building musical instruments, and tend to get caught up in having the biggest, best and most expensive tools, gadgets and gizmos to do the job. While I believe there is no one best way to do something and no real rules concerning the actual construction of a ukulele there are a couple of hard and fast rules that are indeed written in stone. These have to do with mathematics and physics and are indisputable. One of them is scale length and I think you got the answer you are looking for in the previous posts.
    BTW, when considering intonation you also have to take action (string height) into account. Once you build a ukulele that intonates to your satisfaction make a jig for future bridge placements and take the guess work out of it.
    Thanks Chuck--I was tongue in cheek, as your rocket science post came directly after my last post here, but I was pretty sure you weren't directing it at me.

  3. #13
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    Default For the Left brained of us!


  4. #14
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    He has a science background...

  5. #15
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    Pete's right. I have David's book. 20 years a research scientist. More formulas than you can shake a stick at... Good book if you're the rocket science type. (Which admittedly, sometimes I am)

    Left-Brain Lutherie - Using Physics and Engineering Concepts for Building Guitar Family Instruments: An Introductory Guide to Their Practical Application.

    David C. Hurd, Ph.D.
    ISBNO-9760883-0-4
    In an insane society, the sane man must appear insane and must play the ukulele.

  6. #16
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    Miller Indiana
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    Quote Originally Posted by luvzmocha View Post
    I was being facetious... maybe a bad attempt at some humor.

    Coming from an Engineering background I thoroughly enjoyed his book!

  7. #17
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    Musical instruments are not machines, they are an art form.

    Ukantor.

  8. #18
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    Greetings,

    I need a visual to get this straight. From a drafting background, I like measuring things from center to center but I have found references on the Internet about measuring from the front of the nut, and front of the saddle. Could someone take a look at my link at the bottom of the page under

    How do I locate the saddle?...
    http://webpages.charter.net/drw46/uke/uke-problems.htm

    and tell me if A, B or C is correct or are they all wrong?

    Thanks,
    Doug

  9. #19
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    Virginia Beach, Virginia
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    Quote Originally Posted by eleuke View Post
    Pete's right. I have David's book. 20 years a research scientist. More formulas than you can shake a stick at... Good book if you're the rocket science type. (Which admittedly, sometimes I am)

    Left-Brain Lutherie - Using Physics and Engineering Concepts for Building Guitar Family Instruments: An Introductory Guide to Their Practical Application.

    David C. Hurd, Ph.D.
    ISBNO-9760883-0-4
    There is a leftbrainlutherie group on yahoo. I have tried to join it but it says there is no moderator. The group is active as I see there is recent posts in it....just can't read the posts because I am not a member. Anyone know about this group?

    Not meaning to highjack this thread.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug W View Post
    tell me if A, B or C is correct or are they all wrong?
    Well, none are really right as you've drawn nut, fret and saddle with flat tops. What you should measure is from one point of contact to another and it should look something like this:



    When people say the front of the nut they mean the point of contact which should look something like what I've drawn. Although, if there's a slight radius on that front edge, it will push the point of contact back a little. For steel strung instruments the intonation is often fine-tuned by filing the saddle so that the point of contact is nearer or further away from the front edge. You wont often see this on ukuleles but you will see it on guitars.

    Intonation is needed because when you press a string down onto a fret you are stretching it slightly. Think about string 'bending' where you push the string sideways to raise the note. The stiffer the string the more intonation is needed, which is why on electric basses with thick steel-cored strings you can have up to 1/2" of intonation!

    Hope this helps.

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