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Thread: The correct way (ukulele vs uke)

  1. #1
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    Question The correct way (ukulele vs uke)

    I know we have had several discussions like this but its fun to have and see your opinions. The way to say it, some people say uke and some say ukulele. What's your opinion?

    Here is mine, I say ukulele, reason is because i feel its more proper. This shortning of terms is looked down on in other aspects that I know of so maybe this is why my opinion is what it is. Like in the tattoo industry yoou never say tat or tatted. Generaly speaking its a slap in the face. Also growing up with a lot of Hawaiian and other island culture it was never called a uke. This is my opinion, what's yours?
    I Was a post whore. But im back so lets see what we can do to become one again...

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  3. #3
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    This is interesting ( to those of us, Deach, who haven't taken part in such a convo before ;-)).

    New Zealand has a Polynesian culture too, of course, Maori. Many of our place names are Maori and some of our everyday language is Maori.
    Since I was kid we've come a long way to respecting the language and trying to pronounce words properly and have pretty much scrapped various shortened Anglicised versions of Maori place names that we all used as a matter of course 30 years ago (Paraparaumu used to be Paraparam, Waipukerau was called Waipuck, Motueka was often just called Mot.). Quite a few of our landmarks now have two names because Maori and Englisdh are both official languages herei (Our tallest mountain is either Mt Cook or Aoraki, another is either Mt Egmont or Taranaki). There ARE place names (most notably Wanganui which properly should be spelt Whanganui and pronounced differently) that many feel is now an English word and shouldn't be changed. But generally in our culture it's respectful to use the correct name and try to pronounce people's names and other Maori words properly.
    So - I'm imagining it's the same for Hawaiian speakers.
    Soooo - I wouldn't now say yookalaylee. But I do say yook. Is "uke" now an English word? Can we use it withouit offence? Uke lends itself to puns more easily than ukulele, doesn't it? (says he of the Ukes of Hazard).
    In New Zealand the language (te Reo) is "owned" or "protected" by the people as a treasure - so I tend to be led by the opinions of Maori. If they like their language to be spoken a certain way - who am I to argue?

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron View Post
    This is interesting ( to those of us, Deach, who haven't taken part in such a convo before ;-))....
    Let me summarize what's going to happen.

    Half the people won't care, the other half will get offend. There will be a heated argument and this thread will join the rest of the locked uke vs ukulele threads.

  5. #5
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    Nov 2009
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    Or we could all sit back, enjoy some tea and discuss the many connotations of the words "uke" and "ukulele" in a pleasant setting.


    I use both words. When I talk to people who are familiar with the ukulele I say "uke", but when I'm talking to people who know very little about the ukulele I say "ukulele".

    "Uke" makes me feel like I'm part of the ukulele community, as if its slang from a gang or group or something.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by deach View Post
    Let me summarize what's going to happen.

    Half the people won't care, the other half will get offend. There will be a heated argument and this thread will join the rest of the locked uke vs ukulele threads.
    That pretty much sums it up.

  7. #7
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    Just don't call it an "uku".
    Illegitimus Non Carborundum

    I ʻike lākou, ʻo ʻoe, ka mea wale nō nona ka inoa ʻo IĒHOVA;
    ʻO ʻoe nō ka Mea kiʻekiʻe loa ma luna o ka honua a pau.
    Nā Halelū 83:18

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ahnko Honu View Post
    Just don't call it an "uku".
    Why not? I see a lot of Europeans calling it that in the boards.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by deach View Post
    Let me summarize what's going to happen.

    Half the people won't care, the other half will get offend. There will be a heated argument and this thread will join the rest of the locked uke vs ukulele threads.
    'ukulele 'ukulele 'ukulele

    LOL
    Live Aloha
    ------------------------



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  10. #10
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    I don't mind using "uke" in conversation. In text, even on an informal message board, I prefer to write out the word. I'm one of those people who cares about grammar. I usually refrain from correcting others, though.

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