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Thread: How to make a Radius Dish

  1. #11
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    Dave, excellent pics, both the photos and the drawings.

    Sven
    Building blog - http://www.argapa.blogspot.com
    Music and atrocities - http://www.goodcopbadcop.se

  2. #12
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    Been said before david... however: the whole purpose of an arch is to strengthen and avoid sinking. It's why many Asian ukes have sinking fronts - no arch. The fix - fan bracing on Kiwaya sopranos which of course, kills some of the sound!

    Although I cannot undertsand why Martin fronts, flat built, stand up.

  3. #13
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    Thanks for explaining Pete. It's true that it's been said before but that's the nature of forums. There's always someone new coming along (good thing) and asking a question for the umpteenth time (less good). Some forums like the MIMF have extensive libraries or archives of past discussions and newcomers are invited read the FAQ page and search the library and if they don't find the answer, come back and ask again. I've tried searching for info on this forum without much success.

    For guitar makers there are several good books available now and a lot of the information in them can be applied to ukulele but as you keep telling us, ukulele aren't guitars. You really should write the book Pete.

  4. #14
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    It's like a keystone effect... physically... kinda... right? I'd have to agree on fan bracing being a bad idea on sopranos... maybe even larger instruments... makes me think about ribs in nature... the human body's ribs don't fan out... flexibility and strenth. Hmmm

    And the ribcage is the pumping station...
    Last edited by Vic D; 05-04-2010 at 04:23 PM.

  5. #15
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    Good explanation Dave and Pete. I hadn't thought much about the arch adding strength, although arches on structures are certainly known for that, or the difficulties of sanding the braces on a non-spherical surface, but both make sense. I guess I will be making a sanding disc sooner than I thought. I think the cheap asian ukes get away without arches because they make the tops pretty thick, which is also why many of them sound dead.
    Last edited by SweetWaterBlue; 05-04-2010 at 07:29 PM.

  6. #16
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    The tops are made thick for other reasons as well...

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Howlett View Post
    The tops are made thick for other reasons as well...
    Out of curiosity, what are those other reasons Pete?
    Last edited by fahrner; 05-05-2010 at 04:12 AM.

  8. #18
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    Plywood maybe ?

  9. #19
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    Maybe. I did a survey a while back just measuring top thickness of my existing ukes.
    Ohana and Mainland come in around .083" - .089" near the sound hole.
    My Kanilea and Koaloha come in around .072" - .078".
    So, solid wood low priced Asian made are a little thicker.
    What's interesting is my Anuenue (mid priced Asian) is at ~.068". A real light weight but none the louder for it.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by fahrner View Post
    Maybe. I did a survey a while back just measuring top thickness of my existing ukes.
    Ohana and Mainland come in around .083" - .089" near the sound hole.
    My Kanilea and Koaloha come in around .072" - .078".
    So, solid wood low priced Asian made are a little thicker.
    What's interesting is my Anuenue (mid priced Asian) is at ~.068". A real light weight but none the louder for it.
    The size of the ukulele matters as well...

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