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Thread: How to make a Radius Dish

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyfish57 View Post
    The size of the ukulele matters as well...
    These are all tenors if that's what you mean?
    Last edited by fahrner; 05-05-2010 at 06:57 AM. Reason: And carefully measured to avoid braces etc.

  2. #22
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    It was--That's a pretty big range!!

  3. #23
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    Dave; Thank you. This is a great post and very helpful.
    My question now is, in what situations would you want to only have the arch in one direction?
    My assumption here is that the domed radius is stronger in all directions where the second fixture you describe puts strength in only one axis.
    Make any sense? The second method looks a lot simpler.

  4. #24
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    That's why I keep telling you guys that you can't go by the numbers. Thickness alone doesn't mean anything if you don't takes stiffness and strength into consideration.
    Chuck Moore
    Moore Bettah Ukuleles
    http://www.moorebettahukes.com

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by fahrner View Post
    in what situations would you want to only have the arch in one direction?
    My assumption here is that the domed radius is stronger in all directions where the second fixture you describe puts strength in only one axis.
    Well, I suppose that the arched top puts the strength in the direction that the strings are pulling. I'm no expert, I haven't made enough instruments yet, but from what I've seen and read on various forums some top luthiers use this method (Howard Klepper, Stephan Sobell...) I believe Chuck makes arched tops (I'm not sure 'arched' is the right word) and I'm sure he could explain why better than I can.
    Then there are the guys who break the rules and make perfectly flat tops. People like Jim Olson who makes James Taylor's guitars. (A standard JT signature model, he's only making 80, will cost you $15,000. The 20 more expensive special models have already been sold!)

    Quote Originally Posted by fahrner View Post
    The second method looks a lot simpler.
    The sanding board/trough-thingy is a bit simpler to make. Basically a support at each edge and a row of screws down the middle. What's not so simple is sanding the braces. In fact, I made a sort of simple sled to which I attached the braces and slid it along the board a few times.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Higham View Post
    Well, I suppose that the arched top puts the strength in the direction that the strings are pulling. I'm no expert, I haven't made enough instruments yet, but from what I've seen and read on various forums some top luthiers use this method (Howard Klepper, Stephan Sobell...) I believe Chuck makes arched tops (I'm not sure 'arched' is the right word) and I'm sure he could explain why better than I can.
    Then there are the guys who break the rules and make perfectly flat tops. People like Jim Olson who makes James Taylor's guitars. (A standard JT signature model, he's only making 80, will cost you $15,000. The 20 more expensive special models have already been sold!)



    The sanding board/trough-thingy is a bit simpler to make. Basically a support at each edge and a row of screws down the middle. What's not so simple is sanding the braces. In fact, I made a sort of simple sled to which I attached the braces and slid it along the board a few times.
    Thanks Dave.
    Re; making braces; have you seen the jig that holds the brace to the intended radius? You cut whats hanging out straight like on a table saw. When you release the clamp, the brace straightens out and the side you have cut straight now has the radius.
    tough to explain quickly. If this makes no sense, I can find the link.

  7. #27
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    Yes, I have seen those jigs. I don't think they'd work for ukulele braces, they are too short and stiff. Actually, that jig will cut a spline curve too, but for curves in the order of 25' rad the difference between a spline and an arc is so small thet it doesn't much matter.

  8. #28
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    Well, I'll let you know. hehheh.
    Seemed better (more accurate) than trying to do it by hand in a dish.
    If it doesn't work I'll turn it into a neck for a frankenuke.

  9. #29
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    Excellent dish design and tutorial Dave. Much appreciated!

  10. #30
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    I had a fair amount of structural engineering coursework in college, but I will admit that part of the braces thing is still a bit of a mystery to (Like where to put them, how thick to make them, how to anchor them into the binding, what shape they have etc). I am glad we have plans for the first few at least. . We spend a lot of time and effort getting the tops very thin so they will vibrate, then we brace them up, so they won't warp like spaghetti. However, the braces do take away some of the ability to vibrate freely. I know the luthiers say building ukuleles is not the same as building guitars, and its certinaly not the same as building bridges, although the science is the same. Its all quite interesting. There is little substitute for experience.
    Last edited by SweetWaterBlue; 05-05-2010 at 02:04 PM.

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