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Thread: How can you tell when Uke strings need to be replaced?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
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    102

    Default How can you tell when Uke strings need to be replaced?

    Hey all. How do you know when Uke strings need to be replaced?

    I can tell when my steel string guitar strings "could" be changed out, but I can't tell yet when to change uke strings. Do they get quieter or stay out of tune? My strings have been going for a few months without any apparent degradation.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Maryland's Eastern Shore
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    118

    Default

    When they break, become excessively frayed, start to annoy you or you just wanna change them.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Texas
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    Default

    Usually when they either become frayed or have trouble holding their tune.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    Sydney, Australia
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    331

    Default

    When you can see and feel bumps under the string and over the frets.
    - Daniel


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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    562

    Default

    you're right they do seem to last a long time

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Santa Barbara, California
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    1,674

    Default

    Mine last a long time even with extreme playing, and I use thin flourocarbons. But if they break obviously they need to be changed, or if the frets grind little notches on the undersides of the strings (run your finger along the underside of the string, it should be smooth, if not maybe put some new strings on. Or if you don't like the sound, you can always get a new set, or try other strings. It's always fun to try new strings!
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles
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    Default

    Fluorocarbons and nylons last a long time. Wound strings, not so long. On a classical guitar, it is typical to go thru three sets of wound bass strings for every set of nylon trebles.

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