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Thread: cold creep

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    Saint Andrews Bay, FL
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    Default cold creep

    Have heard mention of "cold creep" when using titebond 2 . what is it? does it mean the joint is likely to move or give in cold weather? I know I'm setting myself up for some humorous answers, but I really want to know as I've used titebond 2 before. heard it's better to use titebond 1.
    Last edited by strumsilly; 11-30-2011 at 05:19 AM. Reason: sp
    there is no substitute for LOVE

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    Default

    No, not cold weather...it just moves very slowly under load at ambient temperature.

    Why would anyone use a rubbery glue like T II in instruments? It's perhaps the worst choice you could make... I suspect it's that folks think that because its " 2 " it must be better...an improvement. It's not unless you need waterproof joints like in putting outside doors together or some such.

    Learn how to use hot hide glue. Or use fish glue. Or LMI white glue. And for some joints, use epoxy.

  3. #3
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    Default

    thanks for your reply. I used it because I had it around and didn't know better. now I do.

  4. #4
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    Nov 2011
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    Amity Oregon
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    Default

    Why would it be important to learn a new style of gluing when T2 works great and is a stronger joint than the ones mentioned. I hear all the time when old instruments fall apart due to the glue getting to hot in a car or whatever. T2 would never fail. The glue joint becomes stronger than the wood itself. I have used it for years and never once had a problem. I have also used white glue with no problems either. Also to clarify the T3 is the weather proof one and comes in a green bottle. Just my opinion.

  5. #5
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    Default

    did some research and found this for anyone interested:
    "On instruments most glue joint failures are hardly ever related to the glues strength. The most common culprit is insufficient glue, heat exposure or poor surface to surface contact. "
    from this web site:
    http://www.fretnotguitarrepair.com/r...uitar/glue.php

  6. #6
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    Default

    Ukebuilder...or whoever you are; I beg to differ, and my opinion is backed up by some of the best in the business. Clearly you do not have much experience as an instrument repair tech, and you've bought into the wrong publicity from modern glue manufacturers. I'd suggest you read the links below to see what true masters of the craft think and have learned:

    http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Luth...hideglue1.html

    http://www.acousticmusic.org/Hide-Glue-sp-85.html

    And it's NOT a big deal to use. Look up Mario Proulx' methods, and here's his site: http://www.proulxguitars.com/buildup/build14.htm

    Hot hide glue in a sqeeze bottle...simple to use, superior in all the important aspects for acoustically significant joints.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Amity Oregon
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    Default

    Who ever I am? Well I have power in my shop but that in a new invention as well as the newer glue. I also have power tools, but that is also newer to the old way of hand tools. Hmm I guess I have moved forward into the year 2011 and using what it has to offer. You can beg or differ but I disagree with you and your strong handed ideals. WOW people are different and we have the right to be. I can talk different and use different words and also use what ever I want to glue wood together. I don't believe it for a minute that glue is going to make a well built instrument sound bad.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Western Massachusetts
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ukebuilder View Post
    I don't believe it for a minute that glue is going to make a well built instrument sound bad.
    Probably not, but it will make a well built instrument sound better. All my bracing is now done with hide-glue...For me, there is no looking back!

  9. #9
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    Nov 2011
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    Default

    I was just saying that T2 is not the worst choice for glue. I am not against hide glue at all, I have used it myself, but to change just because someone thinks it better is not a good reason. People all have their own opinion and that is what make this world great. If your at a level of your craft that you want to improve to the next level and glue is the thing that might get you their then by all means go for it. But if your just making them for fun and enjoyment then why would it matter. I have heard so many people argue that this is best or this is best. Its what you as the individual likes and that is it. I have seen hide glue fail many times. This is what is keeping me from using it on a day to day basis. If I feel like it would make what I make that much better then I will change but not because someone says so. Unless a customer came to me and said I should use it or ask me to then I might consider it. Just how I feel. Use what you want for wood or glue or whatever just keep doing it that is what is important.

  10. #10
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    Lets keep is civil guys...
    -Andy

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