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Thread: Guitar for uke players

  1. #11
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    Jan 2013
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    UK
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    I have to say that having very briefly dabbled with guitars, but never having really got into it, I now find that playing the uke has really got me interested in giving guitar a go.

    I'm looking for a short scale guitar, but the choices are really limited in the UK (as far as I've been able to tell) - if anyone's got any pointers, or better still a cheap starter (short scale) guitar for sale - I'm on the lookout!
    Keith

    Mahalo 2020 Soprano - or at least it used to be! http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/fo...akeover-Thread
    Aria ACU-250 Concert
    Clearwater UCW7T Tenor
    Epiphone Les Paul Concert
    Fender 52 Telecaster Concert

  2. #12
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    Oct 2009
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    San Francisco CA USA
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    Cordoba makes requintos that can be tuned like guitars (EADGBE). I don't know what their general availability is in the UK.

    http://www.cordobaguitars.com/p/requinto-580-12-size

    They come in 1/2 (580), 1/4 (520), and 1/8 (480) sizes and sound very nice.
    Last edited by mds725; 05-03-2013 at 08:16 PM.

  3. #13
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    UK
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    So - I managed to bag myself a Squier Mini Strat (3/4 size) - secondhand - for the princely sum of 45!! Happy with that - pics to follow when it arrives.......
    Keith

    Mahalo 2020 Soprano - or at least it used to be! http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/fo...akeover-Thread
    Aria ACU-250 Concert
    Clearwater UCW7T Tenor
    Epiphone Les Paul Concert
    Fender 52 Telecaster Concert

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Port Hueneme, CA
    Posts
    513

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    I know nothing about guitars other than they're big. I do have a question after reading these posts. Do all guitar strings have to be steel or metal? Ouch. I think ukulele strings hurt, how can you stand it with bare fingertips?

  5. #15
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    Oct 2012
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    Clarkston, MI
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    There are steel string guitars and Classical guitars. Classical guitars use strings similar to the ukulele.

    If you want to play guitar just get a full size guitar. As others above have said, don't waste your money moving up incrementally. That would be just like someone going the opposite way and wasting a lot of money buying several ukes to get from guitar down to a soprano. Like Nike says...just do it!
    There's nowhere you can be that isn't where you're meant to be... - John Lennon

  6. #16
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    Aug 2010
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    Newfoundland, Canada
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    2 things that I find frustrating with learning guitar, comming from a ukulele are 1. Steel strings 2. Limited (vertical) space on fretboard between strings. The classical guitar is easier to learn on for these 2 reasons.....though that wide fretboard also makes certain chords more difficult, but this may not be an issue for a beginner who's learning basic chords.

  7. #17
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    Aug 2012
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    SF Bay Area
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    I'm with the folks who recommend going straight to a full-on guitar. Less money in the long run, uuuunnnnnless you develop a bad case of GAS.

    Before taking the plunge, however, you may want to cruise whatever stores are around, and try out bunches of models. Just hold one (while sitting down, preferably), make a random chord shape or few, and strum. Guitars come in a wide variety of sizes and shapes, and this should help you find the best possible fit. The guitar you choose may also need a setup, just as many ukuleles do.

    (It always helps my jitters to come right out and tell the proprietor that I'm just thinking about starting out.)

    Whether you go for steel strings or nylon, your fingers will feel it. This should go away in a week or two as your callouses develop -- if not, the guitar may need a setup, or lighter strings.
    Kamaka Gold Label (Soprano -- c. 1960s -- gCEA)
    "Miss Terry" (Soprano -- c. 1910s-1920s[?] -- ADF#B)
    Keli'i Gold Series (Tenor -- 2012? -- gCEA)
    Kamoa E3-T [Brown] (Tenor -- 2012? -- GCEA)
    ... plus several 6-String Calabash Cousins ...

  8. #18
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    Jan 2011
    Location
    San Jose, CA
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    I
    Quote Originally Posted by Roselynne View Post
    I'm with the folks who recommend going straight to a full-on guitar. Less money in the long run, uuuunnnnnless you develop a bad case of GAS.

    Before taking the plunge, however, you may want to cruise whatever stores are around, and try out bunches of models. Just hold one (while sitting down, preferably), make a random chord shape or few, and strum. Guitars come in a wide variety of sizes and shapes, and this should help you find the best possible fit. The guitar you choose may also need a setup, just as many ukuleles do.

    (It always helps my jitters to come right out and tell the proprietor that I'm just thinking about starting out.)

    Whether you go for steel strings or nylon, your fingers will feel it. This should go away in a week or two as your callouses develop -- if not, the guitar may need a setup, or lighter strings.
    I just got a Taylor GS Mini because it wasn't a huge transition in to a much larger size. The GS doesn't feel much bigger than a tenor Uke.
    9:23448

    Passionately Untalented

    Compass Rose (Custom Tenor) Kamaka HF-3 Kamoa SM-P Kala KA-STg Tenor Pineapple (Rick Turner Build Class)

    Gary Yoshida (added for Mim)

  9. #19
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    Aug 2012
    Location
    SF Bay Area
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    For comfy (well, comfier) fingertips, a classical (nylon-string) guitar may be the way to go.

    Fingers can learn to stretch over time ... but ... if size is a barrier, you may want to consider a 1/2- or 3/4-size classical. They're often found used in smaller, local shops. The advantage over a tenor guitar or guitalele is that smaller classicals are tuned exactly the same as a full-size (4/4) guitar.
    Kamaka Gold Label (Soprano -- c. 1960s -- gCEA)
    "Miss Terry" (Soprano -- c. 1910s-1920s[?] -- ADF#B)
    Keli'i Gold Series (Tenor -- 2012? -- gCEA)
    Kamoa E3-T [Brown] (Tenor -- 2012? -- GCEA)
    ... plus several 6-String Calabash Cousins ...

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Port Hueneme, CA
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    Well, after getting a collection of ukuleles, I now have a smaller collection of guitars. I could not get used to metal strings so I do play a classical style - reminds me more of a Uke. I have classical Blackbird for playing outside, camping, etc. My favorite is a Pepe Romero from Romero Creations. The size is perfect. I have no idea what size you'd call it. (I started with. Guitar I bought from Thomas on UU. The top is sinker redwood and sounds wonderful. It's the same size as a baritone). This is helping my playing cause when I get a song, I'll play on both to see which works best. That's my story and I'm sticking to it. Complete justification
    Last edited by quiltingshirley; 10-10-2014 at 05:33 AM. Reason: Spelling

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