Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 32

Thread: Guitar for uke players

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Quake Country
    Posts
    1,921

    Default

    I am waiting for another new to me guitar coming on Tuesday, a parlor size body but full scale. I love the scale length at 21.5 on my little Yamaha JR-2 for learning stuff in front of the computer, then I try to stretch onto the full scale. If I can't reach I try with a capo, which raises the tension if I don't tune down first. I do like the feel of the smaller body guitar, and as with ukes I love spruce tops! And I love love love the sound of steel strings!
    I should be curling up with a good uke, a book and my dog.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    18

    Default

    Just get a guitalele
    Ukulele Hybrids, everything about ukuleles and ukulele hybrids instruments such as banjo ukulele, guitar ukulele, and many more.
    http://ukulelehybrids.com

    All about ukulele chords!
    http://ukulelehybrids.com/ukulele-chords/

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Port Hueneme, CA
    Posts
    511

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by quiltingshirley View Post
    I know nothing about guitars other than they're big. I do have a question after reading these posts. Do all guitar strings have to be steel or metal? Ouch. I think ukulele strings hurt, how can you stand it with bare fingertips?
    An update, I am now playing a guitar but with nylon strings. My all time favorite is the Pepe Romero Creations one that's close in size to a baritone. No pain and I'm finding it easy to play. Never thought I'd be a uke and guitar player. I like the classical style and it has helped my ukulele playing.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    239

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HBolte View Post
    Classical guitars use strings similar to the ukulele.
    Plus, the fingerboard is wider and flatter, and thus the string spacing as well.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Orange County, California
    Posts
    151

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by allanr View Post
    Another route is via short scale guitars. There are quite a few nice options out there. Martin and Taylor both make nice acoustic guitars for travel, small statured people, and uke players. Ibanez, Gibson Epiphone, and Fender Squier make cool mini electrics all of which are between 100 and 200 dollars.
    Ibanez also makes a worthy acoustic mini-dreadnought clone of the short-scale Baby Taylor, the Ibanez PF2MHOPN, whose street price is only 43% of the Baby Taylor's (whose biggest difference seems to be a solid-wood top).

    Contrary to the OP's cigar-box suggestion, I decided to make the jump directly to six strings, although in a short-scale, "couch guitar" format, via the mini-Ibanez. It's pretty cool to find I can instantly play up the neck of the guitar by remembering that uke chords/shapes are identical on a guitar on closed chords below the fifth fret if one plays only the D-G-B-e strings.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    McDonough, GA
    Posts
    4,442

    Default

    Finally tracked down a Gibson LG 2- 3/4 Arlo Guthrie signature series. 22-7/8 scale. Saw Arlo actually play one! It sounded terrific.

    -Hodge
    Humble strummer of fine ukes.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    at home below Lake Tahoe CA USA
    Posts
    683

    Default

    I've transitioned from dulcimer, to guitar, to mandolin, to tenor-size uke-like cuatra-menor, to soprano uke and banjo-uke, to tenor uke. My big hands feel a little squished at fret #1 or #14 of the sopranos but otherwise I don't see any of those finger-adjustments as being terribly difficult. I *will* admit that a 12-string fretted Cümbüş restrung as a 6-course bowlback banjo-cittern tuned in 5ths (C2-C5) stretches my hands in strange ways. And yes, the Ovation 12-string seems rather monstrous next to a soprano uke, 5.5 times heavier. But I don't see going from uke to standard guitar as being much more painful than, say, going from guitar to long-neck banjo or electric bass.

    Enough of theory. Get thee to music shops and try everything, see what feels right.

    Ukes: Alvarez 4- & Kala 6- & O.Schmidt 8-string tenors; 1 Ohana & 2 Kahalo sopranos; Harmonia concert & bari
    Mandos: Celtic (KE Coleman) & Soviet ovals; Kay & Rogue A-types; Harmonia F2 & mandola
    Banjos: Gretsch banjolin; Varsity banjolele; Orlando 5-string; fretless & fretted Cumbus o'uds
    Acoustic guitars: Martin Backpacker; Ibanez Performance; Art et Lutherie; Academy dobro; Ovation 12-string
    Others: Maffick & First Act dulcimers; Mexican cuatro-menor; Puerto Rican cuatro; Martin tiple; electrics
    Wanted: charango; balalaika; bowlback mando; Venezuelan cuatro; zithers

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    156

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by k0k0peli View Post
    I've transitioned from dulcimer, to guitar, to mandolin, to tenor-size uke-like cuatra-menor, to soprano uke and banjo-uke, to tenor uke. My big hands feel a little squished at fret #1 or #14 of the sopranos but otherwise I don't see any of those finger-adjustments as being terribly difficult. I *will* admit that a 12-string fretted Cümbüş restrung as a 6-course bowlback banjo-cittern tuned in 5ths (C2-C5) stretches my hands in strange ways. And yes, the Ovation 12-string seems rather monstrous next to a soprano uke, 5.5 times heavier.
    I have no earthly idea what you said there, but I'm impressed nonetheless.

    But I don't see going from uke to standard guitar as being much more painful than, say, going from guitar to long-neck banjo or electric bass.
    The uke to guitar as guitar is to bass comparison is very valid. Totally agree.
    I too, have nothing of value to add to this thread...

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Lower Slower Delaware
    Posts
    600

    Default

    Possibly, a 3/4 guitar. I have one of these Cordoba Proteges. It's actually less expensive than some of the crummy ukes out there but has a decent sound. It is also quite a bit more portable than a full sized classical guitar. The neck is narrower, and it is easier to play than the full width neck, but it has a good sound. I play it when I'm tired! The practice still is effective when I move over to my full sized guitar.

    When I switched from uke to guitar, I could not do a darned thing. I used to play as a kid and I couldn't even make a chord, though I was skilled enough to do a lot of fingerstyle ukulele. But the Protege really helped me get more strength and stretch into my hands.
    Ukes: Mainland mahogany tenor, Eleuke Tenor Solid Cutaway Sunburst
    Guitars: Yamaha GS-90, Marcario flamenco negra, Cordoba Protege 3/4

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Hi There!

    Thank you for the tip as I am switching to Guitars now. Will it be good to go for Acoustic Travel Guitar? As All Strings Nylon offers variety of cordoba Mini Guitars. I liked it very much. So Should I go for the same or buy any another guitar.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •