Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Anybody use Zorb-It for humidity control?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Vancouver Island BC-eh!
    Posts
    1,167

    Default Anybody use Zorb-It for humidity control?

    I came across these packets which presumably provide humidity control in both wet AND dry conditions. A testimonial on the website mentions guitars. I did see a reference in an old post but it was a general discussion on "humidity".

    http://www.zorb-it.com/overview/

    Anybody ever try them? What do you think?

    Jim B

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ft Mill, SC
    Posts
    1,414

    Default

    I use them in humid carolina summers and they absorb well, not too sure about how well they work in dry climates.
    Oasis uke humidifier is great for the soundhole.
    Cheers,
    Christian
    Can somebody save me from running my mouth, please?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    DFW, TX, USA
    Posts
    8,342

    Default

    I would not use desicant packs unless you live outdoors in an extremely humid climate!

    Keep in mind, even if you live in a fairly humid area, both heating and air conditioning dry the inside air out so the indoor climate is rarely, if ever, too humid! You might not need humidifiers in that case, but you almost certainly won't need desicant packs, either!

    John
    I'm not entirely convinced that it is possible to polish a turd. However, if one were to accomplish that feat one would still have a turd, and one all the more noticeable for being shiny.

    Check out my ukulele-themed "stuff" at http://www.cafepress.com/fivebyfiveukulele - proceeds go to a good cause...UAS treatment!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Queens, New York
    Posts
    472

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OldePhart View Post
    I would not use desicant packs unless you live outdoors in an extremely humid climate!

    Keep in mind, even if you live in a fairly humid area, both heating and air conditioning dry the inside air out so the indoor climate is rarely, if ever, too humid! You might not need humidifiers in that case, but you almost certainly won't need desicant packs, either!

    John
    I used to use them in Miami. Especially during the summers. Then again we're talking 95% humidity outside and about 65-70% indoors with the AC on. In order to get the humidity to 50% you'd have to keep the AC temp at around 70 which was a bit too cold for our tastes. Now I'm on the opposite end of the spectrum where it's 20% indoors. I just moved to New York and now it's so dry that I'm running a humidifier 24/7 and have wet sponges in all my cases.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ft Mill, SC
    Posts
    1,414

    Default

    Hi John,
    very true, this one is actually a "smart" disectant- it does not force the relative humidity under 50% in the case.

    Quote Originally Posted by OldePhart View Post
    I would not use desicant packs unless you live outdoors in an extremely humid climate!

    Keep in mind, even if you live in a fairly humid area, both heating and air conditioning dry the inside air out so the indoor climate is rarely, if ever, too humid! You might not need humidifiers in that case, but you almost certainly won't need desicant packs, either!

    John
    Cheers,
    Christian
    Can somebody save me from running my mouth, please?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Vancouver Island BC-eh!
    Posts
    1,167

    Default

    I don't have A/C so summers can get horrendous. I think I'll get one and see how it performs keeping close eye on the hygrometer. I can always use it in my tool cabinet if it doesn't work out in the uke case.

    Jim B

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    DFW, TX, USA
    Posts
    8,342

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chrimess View Post
    Hi John,
    very true, this one is actually a "smart" disectant- it does not force the relative humidity under 50% in the case.
    Hmmm, so they sent it to school? Heh, heh.
    I'm not entirely convinced that it is possible to polish a turd. However, if one were to accomplish that feat one would still have a turd, and one all the more noticeable for being shiny.

    Check out my ukulele-themed "stuff" at http://www.cafepress.com/fivebyfiveukulele - proceeds go to a good cause...UAS treatment!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland via Charleston, SC
    Posts
    3,767

    Default

    People who are warning against it, have never lived in South Carolina, where our humidity has humidity. If in doubt, get a cheap room hygrometer to check and be sure, but while I never had a uke back home, I did have a wooden clarinet, and that bad boy always told me about the humidity in the house with AC running.

    Chrimess knows what I'm talking about.

    Kanile'a dlx super concert / Koaloha concert / Ohana sk-38 / Risa Uke Solid Tenor

    @Apollostowel @RockingDodars The Rocking Dodar Blog Proud to be TIGER. A REAL Tiger. All-in all the freakin' time.

    If you need me I'll be on twitter, google+ or r/ukulele

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    DFW, TX, USA
    Posts
    8,342

    Default

    Yeah, I know some places get pretty humid, I'm on the border between east TX humidity and west texas dry, so we get a little of each.

    The thing is that there is rarely any permanent damage to stringed instruments, especially small ones like ukes, from excess humidiity. Typically, high humidity will make tops swell but even after years being swolen things tend to settle back to normal after the instrument is allowed to dry out some. I bought a classical guitar from Florida and it had obviously been somebody's beach guitar - there was even sand in the case. The previous owner had sanded the saddle down to the wooden bridge to compensate for the swollen belly so I had to replace that after I'd had the guitar here in Texas for about three months.

    As long as the owner hasn't tried to compensate for the swelled top by sanding the bridge saddle down to a nub these instruments rarely need more than simply being in a lower humidity for a few months to be pretty much back to normal.

    But, get them too dry and you're looking at cracks, loose frets, and even dried-out glue seams in extreme cases. All of those require expensive intervention to fix.

    So, yeah, if I lived in super wet climate I might use a dessicant, but I sure would be nervous about it 'cause I'd rather have a too-wet uke than one that has dried out and cracked!

    John
    I'm not entirely convinced that it is possible to polish a turd. However, if one were to accomplish that feat one would still have a turd, and one all the more noticeable for being shiny.

    Check out my ukulele-themed "stuff" at http://www.cafepress.com/fivebyfiveukulele - proceeds go to a good cause...UAS treatment!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •