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Thread: What's happening in your shed?

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,066

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    Quote Originally Posted by tobinsuke View Post
    Dennis,

    I only make half rings to start, that way I can hog out material from the inside with a band saw. Then true up the four edges of two halves and glue them together to make a ring, then back to the bandsaw to hog the waste off the outside. Stack and glue the rings. I made a fixture for sawing the unglued halves (ID) as well as the completed rings (OD) that can be set at the proper distance from the blade. Really just two versions of a modified circle jig for bandsaw.
    Then I mount the glued-up roughed-out pot on a fixture I made that lets me pattern sand it true and to size with a robo-sander and my drill press.
    I don't own a lathe, but even if I did I MIGHT still do it this way - it is surprising how little sanding there is to be do after they come off the bandsaw jigs. And the base of the sanding fixture is indexed to match my drilling locations for j-hook hardware and such. I use the same fixture to cut the ledge for the tone ring - just use the bottom edge of the sanding drum and move the fixture closer to the drum. So I can get many operations done without repositioning the work, and this really helps with accuracy. Of course, the same would hold true for a lathe, I suppose.

    How do you do it? It is definitely interesting to hear what others are doing!
    Pretty much the same as you actually, I also use the robo sander in the drill press method, though I'm not totally convinced of the accuracy of the finished product.
    I have seen banjo makers turning rims on a metal lathe on utube, very interesting, so that may be the way I go if I can find a lathe for a reasonable price that is
    Kind Regards
    Dennis

  2. #32

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    I picked up this little baby the other day. Thanks to Chris H for all the information on this model of wide belt sander, guy knows his stuff. I have been getting along fine with my Jet 10-20 but the deal on this was very compelling. They guy bought it, plugged into his 4 inch small dust collector and was soon overwhelmed by dust. He shut it off and didn't run it after that, then died and I bought it from his son for $600. It came with almost $1000 worth of new sanding belts. Now if that beastly motor doesn't take out the electrical system in my shop I'll be in good shape.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Michael Smith; 03-12-2013 at 06:05 PM.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    BC, Canada
    Posts
    214

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    I'm getting back into building after a long break. Been working on a new mold for my "own" design for a soprano. Also waiting for a bunch of wood/tools/hardware to come in the mail, but just picked up two gorgeous 4x4+ blocks of Spanish Cedar at the post office today that I think will yield 12 necks each.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Pawtucket, RI
    Posts
    160

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    Trying to find a way to make some kerfed linings on the cnc...

    Linings3.jpg
    Don Williams
    dewguitars.com/
    Home of the Smiley-Uke TM

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Pawtucket, RI
    Posts
    160

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beau Hannam Ukuleles View Post
    Birds eye maple tenor with special burl fretboard markers and boxed back
    Blue/white spalted tamarind tenor with boxed ebony back.
    Cuban Mahog tenor
    Tassy blackwood with redwood top tenor
    Tiger myrtle concert ( in a few weeks when im back in oz)
    Now that one I just HAVE to see...
    Don Williams
    dewguitars.com/
    Home of the Smiley-Uke TM

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,017

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    Nice Michael.. looks like that sander was made before they started putting the motor inside the base. Nice sander. My new sander is supposed to arrive today.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Grand Junction, Colorado
    Posts
    2,728

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Smith View Post
    I picked up this little baby the other day. Thanks to Chris H for all the information on this model of wide belt sander, guy knows his stuff. I have been getting along fine with my Jet 10-20 but the deal on this was very compelling. They guy bought it, plugged into his 4 inch small dust collector and was soon overwhelmed by dust. He shut it off and didn't run it after that, then died and I bought it from his son for $600. It came with almost $1000 worth of new sanding belts. Now if that beastly motor doesn't take out the electrical system in my shop I'll be in good shape.
    Death- the ultimate deal bestower! Cool purchase for $600, when you die, can i buy it off your son for $150??

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Grand Junction, Colorado
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    2,728

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    Quote Originally Posted by DewGuitars View Post
    Now that one I just HAVE to see...
    It will probably look like this soprano, but more Concerty

    http://www.beauhannamguitars.com/Sopranos.html

    SopranoTigerSide.jpgSopranoTigerBack.jpgSopranoTigerFront.jpgSopranoTigerHeel.jpgSopranoTigerHeelnSide.jpg
    Last edited by Beau Hannam Ukuleles; 03-13-2013 at 06:07 AM.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Grand Junction, Colorado
    Posts
    2,728

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    Quote Originally Posted by DewGuitars View Post
    Trying to find a way to make some kerfed linings on the cnc...

    Linings3.jpg
    That's pretty cool kerfling

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Pawtucket, RI
    Posts
    160

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    Thanks Beau.
    It's actually based on the idea from a guitar builder named Bruce Dickey, who had the idea going back probably eight or nine years ago. This type of kerf (double-sided) has been used in woodworking for eons, and more recently Kevin Ryan created (and patented) a way to make linings like these with his laser. They actually will flex both directions, and even up and down. If you pre-taper your sides before bending like I do, they will follow all the way around without any issues.
    These are just a prototype, as I'm working to get the web a bit thinner at the bottom of the cut, (currently .05") and will work to make the kerf spacing even closer to get them around a tighter radius. When I'm done...I should be able o use them on a soprano uke without issues. I hope.
    If a stiffer rim is desired, one could still glue a veneer on to the outside face after they've been glued onto the sides.
    Don Williams
    dewguitars.com/
    Home of the Smiley-Uke TM

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