Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24

Thread: Kamaka rehab worthwhile?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Alaska USA
    Posts
    627

    Default Kamaka rehab worthwhile?

    Hi all. I was cruising around this afternoon and stumbled on an old Kamaka soprano that has been well used. Well certainly it's used, but its not doing very well. No bridge, no tuners and a nasty hole in the upper corner of the lower bout. It will definitely need a new top.

    I haven't opened negotiations yet and wanted to get your input on whether or not its even worth it. I have no idea how old it is, but I'd guess its from the '60's maybe. I probably will not do the work myself. I'll ask someone more skilled to do it.

    So, should I go for it or would it be better to just walk away from this one. I have a nice Pono soprano, so I'm not looking to replace it. This would be my only "vintage" uke.

    Any thoughts, suggestions or comments?

    Thanks for your help on this!

    Randy

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawaii 5min away from waikiki
    Posts
    28,162

    Default

    Depends how much you get it for...in that condition 100.00 - 150.00or less, it may cost 300+ to fix....and then be worth 350.- 400 dollars..
    it all depends if it sounded good before and if you take it to be fixed at kamaka...the fix would take up to a year, maybe sooner hopefully
    Making music is a gift in itself, and when you can share it ....it is your gift to others

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Kea'au Big Island
    Posts
    67

    Default

    Sounds pretty trashed.10 bucks and you have an interesting wallhanger?From the work I have had done by luthiers I don't think it would be economical.How about taking a photo and asking Kamaka what they think.I haven't dealt with them for years,but I would think they could at least give you an idea what they would charge.Plus any time you repalce anything on a vintage the value goes down.Just the facts of the trade.But if the repair was done by Kamaka,not so bad.Just my humble opinion.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    4,255

    Default

    Aloha Randy. I refurbed a Kamaka tiki last year at the factory. It will take a while (8 months +) and the cost depends on what is there and what needs fixing. You need to check out bracing, fret work, etc. In my case there was a lot of sentiment involved and just some cracks.

    Some pictures might help but as Stan said, you may be paying more for repairs than it's worth.


    Hope this helps
    Last edited by vanflynn; 09-12-2013 at 06:40 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    4,953

    Default

    Doesn't sound like it'd be worth it to me. You could probably pick up a new or "gently used" Kamaka for what it would cost to restore this one. Replacing the top would destroy any "vintage" aspect of it IMO.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    335

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKuker View Post
    Hi all. I was cruising around this afternoon and stumbled on an old Kamaka soprano that has been well used. Well certainly it's used, but its not doing very well. No bridge, no tuners and a nasty hole in the upper corner of the lower bout. It will definitely need a new top.

    I haven't opened negotiations yet and wanted to get your input on whether or not its even worth it. I have no idea how old it is, but I'd guess its from the '60's maybe. I probably will not do the work myself. I'll ask someone more skilled to do it.

    So, should I go for it or would it be better to just walk away from this one. I have a nice Pono soprano, so I'm not looking to replace it. This would be my only "vintage" uke.

    Any thoughts, suggestions or comments?

    Thanks for your help on this!

    Randy
    Reading the description, it seems to be in pretty bad shape. Personally, I would walk away. But thinking that it is a vintage Kamaka, hmm, I might have different opinion.
    Global Business Franchise - http://www.ageloc.com

  7. #7

    Default

    some things are just worth saving, maybe an offer that allows for the repairs. Yes you could most likely buy one for what it would cost to repair........ but then who would save it? History has to be worth something.
    20's to 30's Harmony Soprano. Collings MT2 Mandolin.
    Other toys require tools!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Honolulu/Hawaii
    Posts
    801

    Default

    not worth it, you can pick up a NICE condition vintage kamaka soprano in the $300-$450 range. it would be worth it if you got it for free then worked on repairs yourself to save a ukulele. on top of that you wont know the sound of it after the repair and the time you put into it as well.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawaii 5min away from waikiki
    Posts
    28,162

    Default

    Yes lots of risk, if it does not have sentimental value to you pass...there are always better deals...
    Making music is a gift in itself, and when you can share it ....it is your gift to others

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Alabama, USA
    Posts
    2,852

    Default

    If you can get it for a song, maybe then you could fix it or not fix it, but not be out a lot of money.
    Click a photo for information!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •