Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25

Thread: Making my First Electric Ukulele...feasibility and help please!

  1. #1

    Default Making my First Electric Ukulele...feasibility and help please!

    I've always been interested in how people build acoustic instruments, but I feel like it is too much of a task for a jobless teenager. With that being said, I feel like an electric ukulele would be much more feasible for me. This would be my first time building this sort of thing, but that isn't to say I haven't done my fair share of research. So far, this is my go-to for the build:
    http://www.instructables.com/id/How-...ctric-Ukulele/

    I would like to build a tenor. I have a nice lumber shop a few streets from me that I would like to order a slab of wood for the body from. Is mahogany the way to go, or should I be open to anything else? Also, I have looked at building the neck, and it seems overwhelmingly terrifying. Should I just buy one, or would It be best to make one?

    I'm willing to do the work and learn for this project, but I don't want to be building something I won't ever be able to use. If what I'm talking about is unrealistic in the slightest, please let me know so I can make changes to the plan.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    337

    Default

    Oddly enough, I'm almost done with some step-by-step plans to build a tenor electric ukulele. They should be live on my blog in the next two weeks. I'm trying to make the plans as easily as possible, while still making a cool and playable instrument. http://circuitsandstrings.wordpress.com/free-plans/

    I'll also have a companion video on my YouTube channel. http://www.youtube.com/user/CircuitsAndStrings

    For an electric, maple is really good for the neck. Alder, ash, and mahogany are good for the body.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Stratford, Connecticut
    Posts
    1,627

    Default

    I had plans to reproduce my 80's BC Rich Guitar into a concert or tenor ukulele. I started buying things like a black bridge from eBay like the one in the instructable planning on making a steel stringed uke. My plan was to buy BC Rich labeled P Bass pickups from china and rewire them to work as two.

    Then I heard a Risa on youtube and saw a nylon stringed uke ran though an effects box. I became only more confused as nylon stringed ukes with piezo pickups sound awesome through an amp as well.

    My question which I never asked yet due to taking on too many projects. The answer might change buying a premade neck. Does a steel stringed uke need an adjustable trussrod or stabilizer rod in the neck?
    This space reserved for a smart or witty comment or a famous quote. It may also be used to promote my accomplishments should I ever accomplish anything worth sharing.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Queanbeyan, NSW Australia.
    Posts
    1,838

    Default

    The most difficult part of the neck is fretting it accurately and on this note you COULD by a fretted fretboard already done. There would still be some aspects of the neck you would need to be careful with but a fretted fretboard would make it much easier.

    Anthony

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DanielHulbert View Post
    Oddly enough, I'm almost done with some step-by-step plans to build a tenor electric ukulele. They should be live on my blog in the next two weeks. I'm trying to make the plans as easily as possible, while still making a cool and playable instrument. http://circuitsandstrings.wordpress.com/free-plans/

    I'll also have a companion video on my YouTube channel. http://www.youtube.com/user/CircuitsAndStrings

    For an electric, maple is really good for the neck. Alder, ash, and mahogany are good for the body.
    Ahh great! I'll be sure to check it out. Thanks!

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by anthonyg View Post
    The most difficult part of the neck is fretting it accurately and on this note you COULD by a fretted fretboard already done. There would still be some aspects of the neck you would need to be careful with but a fretted fretboard would make it much easier.

    Anthony
    I was looking at that, how would I get the shape of the neck and head? Lots of sanding? And thanks, ill look at fretted fretboards now.

    I was thinking the same thing inksplosive. I was going to use mandolin steel strings.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    337

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Inksplosive AL View Post
    Does a steel stringed uke need an adjustable trussrod or stabilizer rod in the neck?
    I've made about a dozen steel string ukuleles. I put a rod in one of them, but not in the rest. I use really light strings. All of the necks have been very stable.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Queanbeyan, NSW Australia.
    Posts
    1,838

    Default

    One of the most obvious signs of a new or skilled builder is how well carved the neck is. They're carved to start with. Still, I have a couple of ukulele's with pretty rough necks but they still work just fine. Bolt on electric is easier. Start with a rectangular section and carefully round it off in the middle and through the headstock transition. Leave the heel where you bolt it on square. If you leave the neck chunky enough you won't need a truss rod. I run the lightest 4 strings from a set of 10-46 electric guitar strings on my steel, electric ukulele.

    Anthony

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DanielHulbert View Post
    I've made about a dozen steel string ukuleles. I put a rod in one of them, but not in the rest. I use really light strings. All of the necks have been very stable.
    I've started looking at your videos, I love them. I've been reading a lot more about the neck, as it seems like the main issue that I will have. I decided that a little math won't hurt me, and that maybe doing the fret board myself would be a fun endeavor to take on.

    Here is a link to what I think I want, I love the ebony and Indian Rosewood, so either of those would be ideal for me: http://www.lmii.com/products/mostly-...e-fingerboards

    I understand I would have to buy fret wire, and glue it down safely to the neck. The only issue would be deciding whether to add an inlay for the frets or not. The more and more I look into this, the more I want to do it right.

    Here is a video that I thought helped me a lot:


    Along with this:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1K5LeSE1QOE

    Hopefully if someone is ever in the same position as me, this will help them!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    337

    Default

    I just posted some electric ukulele plans that I've been working on. They might be of some help in your quest.

    http://circuitsandstrings.wordpress....le-free-plans/
    Last edited by DanielHulbert; 02-09-2014 at 02:44 PM.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •