View Poll Results: Which Magic Fluke Company instruments do you own?

Voters
207. You may not vote on this poll
  • Fluke ukulele

    102 49.28%
  • Flea ukulele

    132 63.77%
  • Firefly banjo ukulele

    48 23.19%
  • Fluke SB solid-body electric ukulele

    4 1.93%
  • Cricket Violin

    3 1.45%
Multiple Choice Poll.
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Thread: The Magic Fluke Company Appreciation thread

  1. #241
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Wakanda
    Posts
    6,468

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Yishai View Post
    Has anyone here ever thought of putting a Flea/Fluke neck on a different body?

    I recently found a concert flea with a wood fretboard and fell in love with the feel of the neck. Every chord I played felt perfect. I'm not a big fan of these bodies though, especially the thermoplastic back and sides. It's the same reason I never bought an Ovation guitar.

    Anyway, I was wondering if it would be possible to just take the neck off and have someone attach it to a different body. Or is the neck joint different in a way that would make it incompatible?
    You would have more success in using a flat spokeshave to carve the back of the neck and then a hole saw of appropriate diameter and rasps to shape the headstock of a different uke than to transplant the neck of a Fluke or Flea...

    The neck on a Fluke or Flea is screwed into the polycarbonate body, and then the soundboard is on top of that, and then the fretboard is on top of that....

    so to the remove the neck, you have to sacrifice the Fluke or Flea pretty much, unless you use great finesse in removing the fretboard as well as the top. This requires some skill, the proper tools, and LOTS of patience.

    TO me, that's a lot of money to spend just to extract the neck.

    Also, most traditional ukuleles use some form of dovetail joint, tenon dowels, or bolt-on method, so if you are going to use something like a Kala or Ohana to recieve the neck, you will have to do some serious modifications to the neck block inside, which involves removing the top (soundboard) of the recipient instrument.

    Seems like too much work.

    If it were me, I'd reshape the neck of another instrument and just leave the tuners as they are in the headstock on that instrument.

    A spokeshave, rasps and files are not complicated to use and can be had for cheap (less than $50 US), and you will also need several different grades of sandpaper to do a smooth finishing on the neck, and likely also some sealant or stain to match the rest of the instrument and protect the wood...
    This ═╣FAQ link╠═ will help you learn about many things.
    You should click it, as the answers are waiting for you.

  2. #242
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Thank you. Yes, that does sound like too much time, money, and effort. Better to just enjoy the Flea as it was made.

  3. #243
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    PA, USA
    Posts
    2

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    1. What do I have? Soprano Flea in Pistachio Green, SN: 167 (approx. 2004), Strung low G.

    2. Why did I buy it? Honestly it was because of an EBay coupon that was going to expire. I started scrolling through the Buy-It-Nowís and spotted this lightly used instrument. I didnít have a soprano and the green color just spoke to me.

    3. What do I like/hate?
    Likes: I like being able to just leave this uke sitting out (this is currently my office uke). It plays and sound good, was not expensive and is semi-rugged. As a bonus it has the flat end so that it sits there just waiting to be played.
    Hates: None. The friction tuners arenít great but donít bother me enough to go through the effort of changing them.

    4. Plan to buy another? I donít currently plan to, but would definitely consider buying another, maybe a concert. Iím more of an opportunist when it comes to buying.

    5. Replace? I would definitely buy another to replace it. I donít know of anything better for the office than a flea.

    Flea.jpg

    Additional Comments:
    Shortly after purchasing my flea I realized it had the older Connecticut label with a low serial number. I was curious about the year of manufacture and what they called the light green color (it was discontinued). I emailed the Magic Fluke Company for information and Beth responded the next day with the answers. Thatís some great customer service considering Iím not even the original customer!
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Currently the home of:
    • Magic Fluke, Flea Soprano, Pistachio Green, ~2004
    • Kamaka, HF-2, Koa Concert, 2000
    • Braddah Uke (Mele), Mahogany Tenor 4-String, ~1998
    • Kamaka, HF-36, Koa Tenor 6-String, 2016 (anniv. ed.)

  4. #244
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Wakanda
    Posts
    6,468

    Default

    Thanks for sharing your story and the photos of your now-rare color soprano Flea.

    For the past few years all of the greens are called 'Eucalyptus' and a more dark green, sort of like a forest green color.

    Quote Originally Posted by jim275 View Post
    1. What do I have? Soprano Flea in Pistachio Green, SN: 167 (approx. 2004), Strung low G.

    2. Why did I buy it? Honestly it was because of an EBay coupon that was going to expire. I started scrolling through the Buy-It-Now’s and spotted this lightly used instrument. I didn’t have a soprano and the green color just spoke to me.

    3. What do I like/hate?
    Likes: I like being able to just leave this uke sitting out (this is currently my office uke). It plays and sound good, was not expensive and is semi-rugged. As a bonus it has the flat end so that it sits there just waiting to be played.
    Hates: None. The friction tuners aren’t great but don’t bother me enough to go through the effort of changing them.

    4. Plan to buy another? I don’t currently plan to, but would definitely consider buying another, maybe a concert. I’m more of an opportunist when it comes to buying.

    5. Replace? I would definitely buy another to replace it. I don’t know of anything better for the office than a flea.

    Flea.jpg

    Additional Comments:
    Shortly after purchasing my flea I realized it had the older Connecticut label with a low serial number. I was curious about the year of manufacture and what they called the light green color (it was discontinued). I emailed the Magic Fluke Company for information and Beth responded the next day with the answers. That’s some great customer service considering I’m not even the original customer!
    This ═╣FAQ link╠═ will help you learn about many things.
    You should click it, as the answers are waiting for you.

  5. #245
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    L.A. California
    Posts
    700

    Default

    I was playing my concert Fluke yesterday and it still amazes me how much I love the sound.
    One thing I plan to do soon is to change the tuners to Grover geared machines. Since I started playing
    last June I am getting a better ear for notes only slightly out of tune,
    Playing my Magic Fluke and grinning like a fool!

  6. #246
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Springfield, IL
    Posts
    562

    Default

    Sounds great, Maki !! I (and Booli too) have swapped out the friction pegs on Flukes and Fleas, for the Grover geared pegs (or even the very inexpensive Kmise brand with the "classical"-looking buttons), a couple of times in the past, and it's definitely "doable". The funny thing is, in each instance I eventually put the original friction pegs back on! I think I may have concluded that the original frictions are just so much a part of the "vibe" of a Fluke or Flea, that I actually began to miss them! And over time, I have (little-by-little) become more adept at working with the frictions confidently and effectively, especially in the area of tweaking the screw tightness so that they're snug enough to hold tuning securely, but not not overly tight; and I think that has something to do with it too. As others have pointed out, it's a good idea, when fine-tuning with friction pegs, to automatically back the peg down a little bit first, and then bring the note up to the desired pitch. Of course we all have our preferences and enjoy exploring these things; good luck on your switch-out!

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