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Thread: Why do we accept such cheap junk ukes on the market

  1. #11
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    See, the problem with that uke is that they did not use lag bolts to hold the bridge in place properly.

    BTW, diamonds are also small, so they should be cheap, too.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by pootsie View Post
    See, the problem with that uke is that they did not use lag bolts to hold the bridge in place properly.

    BTW, diamonds are also small, so they should be cheap, too.
    Now that's just silly, apples to oranges. What you meant was that violins and mandolins are also small, so they should be cheap, too. I'll give you ten bucks for that Stradivarius. If you can't break a twenty, you can throw in that 1924 Lloyd Loar F-style, too.



  3. #13
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    I've had a few comments back elsewhere claiming that this is a toy and was never meant to be played - like that is some kind of excuse.

    In that case, why does the box say 'comes with how to play guide' and inside there was this little chord chart and how to tune up leaflet!!?

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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by bazmaz View Post
    One for beginners to read. Who is buying the flood of ultra cheap ukes on the market?

    I decided to look closer at those awful examples and found one so badly built it would never play accurately. Ebay is awash with this sort of thing. It's a real shame.

    Take a look at the pictures and video on this post

    http://www.gotaukulele.com/2014/03/w...-ukuleles.html
    IMO this brings us into the realm of psychology. Humans in general are an ignorant lot and not necessarily any fault of their own but how they are educated in the home and in our schools and society in general. If one is not able to think critically then one will be prone to fall for wild advertising claims. Any material field/hobby etc. can show the same things going on. Cheap telescopes that make wild claims to magnification but the optics are so poor you can't tell what you are magnifying and I could go on and on endlessly with examples. It's amazing to me that humans survive as well as we do. Thanks mostly to the few who do the thinking for the rest.

    So I'd say don't worry about what others do but make sure you don't get duped too badly yourself.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by bazmaz View Post
    One for beginners to read. Who is buying the flood of ultra cheap ukes on the market?
    People have an inherent belief they can get something for nothing.


    Quote Originally Posted by OldePhart View Post
    When the parents finally realize that I'm serious I'll explain that if you want your child to learn to play successfully then get them the absolute best instrument you can afford.
    In addition, parents should also realize a quality instrument has resale value, and also a good lesson for Children to respect and care for an instrument, which lesson carries on to other things throughout life.

  6. #16

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    I think cheap instruments in childhood are at the root of my Instrument Acquisition Syndrome. I had a cheap, but playable clarinet, and was much better on my friend's Buffet. People who don't play instruments really don't understand the differences.

    When I was 14 my parents bought me a Zim Gar guitar. It was awful. The neck bowed about an inch and a half by the time I threw it out. I saved my money for a year to buy a Gibson.

    A few years ago I decided to learn flute and bought a cheap $100 flute off of Ebay. It was OK for about a week, then one day I was playing it and something went "sproing". Keys literally went flying off the instrument. I threw it away and bought a Yamaha.

  7. #17
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    Just looked at them in our local discount shop...£7:99.....needless to say they didn't sell one to me.

  8. #18
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    I don't think the point is whether junk exists and/or whether it continues to do so. "Junk" is always a matter of opinion. I think the point is whether buyers truly know what they're looking for. Many times they don't, especially if they're beginners, or a non-musical parent is buying for an aspiring child. So, it's up to us--assuming people listen--to demonstrate quality instruments and musicality.

    People will still buy what we think are junk ukes. All we can do is be there to pick up the pieces, as it were, and do our best to keep the number of pieces to a minimum. But they say experience is the best teacher, and I'd have to agree...

    Also, not everyone wants the same thing in a uke, physically or musically. Some people do want a toy, and we know there's an abundance there. Others want a playable uke. And still others, as they progress, want a higher quality, better-sounding uke. What that is, varies from person to person. Again, I think the best we can do is be available to people.

  9. #19
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    [QUOTE=bazmaz;1494128 Who is buying the flood of ultra cheap ukes on the market?
    [/QUOTE]

    Innocent sheep who don't know any better.

    I bought a cheap junk guitar, at a premium price. Sold to me by my music teacher, I relied on his judgement. Hey, who was I to contradict the expert?

    Action way too high at both the 1st and 17th frets, intonation off, fret ends sticking out, other problems. I thought this was the way it was. How or why he expected me to continue paying for lessons after my fingers hurt so much I couldn't type or hold a pen, is a mystery to me.

    I own one of these low end ukes, but now I know what makes for a playable instrument. The internet is a treasure trove of information and is why I made a second try.
    Last edited by seneystretch; 03-17-2014 at 06:40 AM.
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  10. #20
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    Interesting comment re the internet that was put to me earlier on Facebook in response to this.

    The likes of ebay and online shopping makes it so much easier to find junk like this uke and hit 'buy'. This guy pointed out that people consider nothing wrong with spending 100's on a smartphone, laptop, iPad to do just that, but then assume that a 10 quid ukulele is normal. Would those people expect a $50 dollar smartphone or tablet to work as well as the top end ones?
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