Page 2 of 17 FirstFirst 123412 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 166

Thread: Build Thread: StewMac Tenor Ukulele Kit

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    209

    Default

    To square up the edge of the sides, I used a tip that I found from a woodworking article months ago, double-sided tape with 120-grit on a hand plane.



    Keeping both flat against the granite, I used slow and short motions to sand down to the pencil line.



    I was able to get it real close to square.



    I didn't get it perfect, so I kept working at it.


  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    209

    Default

    After a couple of tries, I accepted that I won't be able to get it perfect using a hand plane. There's just too much variance in my motion. These are the times I wish I had a disc sander. I got it very close and I'll accept this bit of imperfection.



    So after a 2nd dry fit (LESSON LEARNED #4), Jackie and I glued in the end and neck blocks.



    This is Jackie cleaning up the squeeze out with a chisel.



    Glued up the neck block and cleaned up the squeeze out.



    Here he is all clamped up, next step will be to glue in the lining.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    JoCo, NC (near Raleigh)
    Posts
    4,548

    Default

    Fascinating. That build plan is enough to scare me off from such a project, but I look forward to following this thread.
    Ukulele:
    Iriguchi Tenor "Weeble" - A, WoU Clarity
    Blue Star 19" baritone Konablaster - DGBE
    Cocobolo 16" SC#1-gCEA, SC SLMU
    Ono #42 19" baritone, Ab, LW
    Imua iET-Bb, M600
    Covered Bridge CLN pineapple - Eb cuatro, SC XLL
    Rogue bari
    Bonanza super tenor, cFAD SC LHU
    Kala KSLNG, Eb SC XLU
    Flea soprano, C LW
    Hanson 5-string tenor, dGCEA
    Bonanza SLN GCEA
    Bonanzalele concert
    Guitars:
    Jupiter #47, G, TI CF127

    !Flukutronic!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Geneva, Florida
    Posts
    127

    Default

    Hi! This looks fantastic and your photos are a wonderful guide! I built my first soprano- the Stew Mac kit and never realized how much fun I was going to have while doing it!!!!! I'm now attempting my first built from scratch!
    All the best to you and Jackie!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    McDonough, GA
    Posts
    4,493

    Default

    Thank you Joe. I plan on starting a StewMac soprano kit soon, and your posts are just what I needed to see.
    -Hodge
    Humble strummer of fine ukes.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    209

    Default

    Thanks everyone for the kinds words, Jackie and I are having a blast and really enjoy doing this build together! Your words give me tons of motivation to keep working and also posting what I can to this thread. Cheers!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    209

    Default

    We dodged a huge bullet last night and recovered from a major disaster...I forgot to put wax paper between the jig and the neckblock.

    Quote Originally Posted by joeguam as LESSON LEARNED #5
    Unfortunately this lesson was learned the hard way. The instructions say to place wax paper between the jig and the neck/end blocks when gluing, but I forgot. Be sure to always use wax paper to ensure you don't glue your pieces to your work surface!
    The end block only glued a bit to the jig from squeeze out, so I was able to massage it loose, however, the neck block was stuck. As you can see in this picture, I also cracked a bit of the side overhanging the neck block. Thankfully this piece will be sanded off anyway, but cracks are never a good thing.


    I was able to carefully work a small chisel in between the jig and the sides and thankfully get it loose, but there was a bit of damage done.




    I glued the cracked piece back together using TB glue and sanded off most of the glue residue from the affected area. This area will be pore-filled and final sanded and, more specifically covered by the neck heel.


    Phew! Glad it wasn't a disaster, just took about an hour extra of time to correct.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    209

    Default

    So once we got everything back to normal, we moved on to the next step which was to glue in the non-kerfed lining.

    I used a chisel to slowly trim the lining until it fit perfectly.
    Quote Originally Posted by joeguam as LESSON LEARNED #6!
    Thankfully this lesson was not learned the hard way. I read a previous article somewhere online where the guy got impatient and trimmed the rosette too much, too quickly. He had to band-aid the situation but it didn't look good. I also saw Aaron from Mya-Moe trim the kerfed lining too much in their "Birth of a Mya-Moe" series. He had to use extra lining and do it over, but in this kit, you don't have extra material. Because of this, I took my time and trimmed off very little with each test fit.


    Following lesson learned #4, we made sure to dry fit and clamp. This showed us the areas that really needed a lot more clamping than others.


    You can see slightly at the waist that there's a pencil mark that I used for reference when I first fitted the lining. Our method was to situate the waist together (because this can't be moved), mark a reference line, then cut the ends to fit.


    All looked good, so this is Jackie slapping on the glue. I found an "artist glue bottle" with a very fine point at the craft store for about $2.00, this really helps keep things from becoming messy.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    209

    Default

    So we did a rinse/repeat for the other side and glued him up to sleep for the night.
    Quote Originally Posted by joeguam as LESSON LEARNED #7!
    The instructions say to use clothespins to clamp, however, we found that clothespins do not provide sufficient clamping pressure. This is why we used the bigger black clamps and then filled in any remaining areas with clothespins. My recommendation would be to use the black office supply binder clamps which are much stronger (got this trick from a Kanile'a Ukulele Factory Tour YouTube video), or the small mini clamps Mya-Moe uses in their "Birth of a Mya-Moe" series.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    209

    Default

    Once again, could not wait to wake up and get back to working on this uke! I'm loving this!

    Removed all the clamps and checked out the lining we glued for the back, looks real good.


    So I flipped him over and did the same process for the top lining. Here's the dry fit...always have to dry fit first.


    Here he his all glued up. I remembered that I had 4 bar clamps sitting around so I used them to get better clamping pressure than the clothespins.


    The next step will be to start gluing the back bracing.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •