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Thread: "It Is A Puzzlement!"

  1. #31
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    For anybody who want some more background in music theory, I can recommend this course. It is of course not uke specific, as it is music theory not uke theory .
    https://www.coursera.org/course/musictheory
    Oh and the good thing: it's free!
    My youtube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/xommen
    My soundclouds: https://soundcloud.com/wvommen, https://soundcloud.com/uke22live
    The band: http://www.uke22.nl
    My ukes:
    Soprano: Black Korala, Bach Spruce top
    Concert: Epiphone Les Paul, Ohana CKS-15E, Makawao UK 40, Richwood
    Tenor:
    Hudson HUK-T.

  2. #32
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    Ubulele, I enjoyed your post. I'm a relative novice to music theory and did have to take my time, going slowly through the explanation but I did understand it. It is a complex subject and sometimes a discussion can get beyond my ability to understand, given my limited background but I did get a better understanding of chord formation. Early on, I too was curious when I stumbled on two identical fingerings having different names and with my most rudimentary understanding of music theory, I wrote it off to the fact that with just 4 strings and limited reach one can only make a finite number of fingerings and in varying keys, some might turn out to be the same and that you will call them one name rather than the other, depending which key the music is written in. Kind of like why we use the sharp notation or the flat...it depending on the key. Your explanation filled in a lot of the blanks.

    If one asks a question, one should be prepared for some pretty knowledgable answers here on UU. Sometimes I have asked questions as a novice where the answer or solution to a problem was beyond my scope (like a repair or adjustment) and I needed to defer to a professional, but sometimes with the explanation folks gave, I could do something myself, if I carefully digested what they were saying to me. This discussion seems to follow on those lines. The answer was given by folks with superior knowledge of music theory and one either makes the effort to learn more and try to understand it or just accepts it as an issue better left for the professionals.

  3. #33
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    Kerrville, TX - Heart of the Fabulous Texas Hill Country
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    Chords are defined by the intervals between the notes in them. The interesting thing about diminished 7th chords is that they are the only chords in which all the intervals are the same, minor 3rds stacked up on top of each other. So, logically, you can see that there are really only 3 diminished 7th cords, that is, diminished chords with different notes in them. That's because once you get to the third series of stacked minor thirds, you've covered all the notes in the chromatic scale, and going any further simply repeats combinations already played. All the diminished chords are simply inversions of one of the three. Once you see this symmetry, the mystery of diminished chords goes "poof," and you will be very comfortable with them.
    "The sole cause of all human misery is the inability of people
    to sit quietly in their rooms." - Blaise Pascal, 1670

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by bunnyf View Post
    Ubulele, I enjoyed your post. I'm a relative novice to music theory and did have to take my time, going slowly through the explanation but I did understand it. It is a complex subject and sometimes a discussion can get beyond my ability to understand, given my limited background but I did get a better understanding of chord formation. Early on, I too was curious when I stumbled on two identical fingerings having different names and with my most rudimentary understanding of music theory, I wrote it off to the fact that with just 4 strings and limited reach one can only make a finite number of fingerings and in varying keys, some might turn out to be the same and that you will call them one name rather than the other, depending which key the music is written in. Kind of like why we use the sharp notation or the flat...it depending on the key. Your explanation filled in a lot of the blanks.

    If one asks a question, one should be prepared for some pretty knowledgable answers here on UU. Sometimes I have asked questions as a novice where the answer or solution to a problem was beyond my scope (like a repair or adjustment) and I needed to defer to a professional, but sometimes with the explanation folks gave, I could do something myself, if I carefully digested what they were saying to me. This discussion seems to follow on those lines. The answer was given by folks with superior knowledge of music theory and one either makes the effort to learn more and try to understand it or just accepts it as an issue better left for the professionals.
    Music theory it great and some people spend a lifetime learning and understanding it. But for me, music theory is like my approach to ukulele playing in general. I started playing the ukulele because I wanted to play songs. So I found an easy song, I think it was "You're Nothing but a Hound Dog", learned the chords, and started playing and singing it. All I needed was G,C7,and a D7. So then I found another song, and another, and another, and I added to my chord repertoire as needed. I think that after the first week, I knew enough chords to play a bunch of songs, which was probably a half dozen chords. So now I think I know twenty-five or thirty chords and I can play I don't know how many songs. But I guess the point I'm making is that I don't just learn chords. If I don't have a use for a chord, I don't need to learn it. I only learn what I need to do what I want to do, which is sing and play songs. So sometimes people start going on a big discourse on some music theory subject, and they lose me. Because I don't want to learn music theory, I want to learn enough music theory so that I can sing and play songs. If it isn't applicable to what I'm doing, I don't need to know it. Note however, I think a lot of the information in this thread has been useful, and I'm not talking about this thread specifically, but more in a general sense. But I think that often times people who are interested in music theory as an endeavor in itself, forget that many of us just want to play our ukes.
    Last edited by Rllink; 08-11-2014 at 04:18 AM.
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.

    I just want everyone to understand that I am not a ukulele expert, even though it may look at times like I'm pretending to be.

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...tective+Agency

  5. #35
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    Rllink, I have taken the same path as you. I just select a song I fancy, learn what I need to play and sing along and have a jolly time and naturally as time passes I get a bit better and know a bit more. Along the way a technique, theory, exercise or a bit of technical info peaks my curiousity and I read up, watch vids, practice. Sometimes one just doesn't want to go that deep into a particular area, that's why some of us are music majors and some of us are dentists.

  6. #36
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    Well, Rllink, I couldn't possibly agree with you more. When I started out playing, I didn't even use tabs. I just used the sheet music and learned whatever chords I needed. I mostly wanted to sing; I could play tunes on my other instruments. I already knew plenty of theory, though not much about chords. But some Uke books don't even have music, only those stupid tabs. So now I'm learning them.

    I started this thread because I was curious about the 6 and minor 7th "puzzlement,"but it blossomed into the great chord debate which I am really enjoying. This thread already has more info than I needed, but some of it is very interesting and maybe useful. Someone could have said "that's just the way it is", and I could have joined the crowd. But that's not my way. I like to try to understand things and know why i'm doing them. I have trouble "Just Doing It", or joining the crowd. I'd rather just drop things that I don't understand.

    Anyway, for the time being, I'll play C6, but I refuse to play Am7.
    Kala "Spalted" baritone - Lo D GBE- Fingerstyle
    Gold Tone tenor banjolele - Lo F BbDF Fingerstyle
    Luna “Peace” concert - CGDA (5ths) Fingerstyle

    Kala tenor eight string - gGcCEEAA Strum
    Flea "Red" concert - Hi-F BbDG Strum
    Kala "Exotic Mahogany" soprano - Hi-A DF#B Strum

    Mahalo yellow "Smiley" soprano (Dad's Day gift)
    Ka-Lai Pineapple soprano (old) gift

    Old age should rather be feared than death. - Juvenal
    God gave us old age so we wouldn't mind dying so much.

  7. #37
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    VegasGeorge, I'm on the very brink of understanding your comment about the Diminished 7th Chords. That's the best definition I've seen so far. The whole thing still doesn't make sense, yet it kinda does. The idea that some chords can just fit in anywhere confuses me. I guess I should just play the chords on the tabs and sing the words. It's a good thing I wasn't a music major in college; my head would have exploded. Well, anyway, thanks for the good info.
    Kala "Spalted" baritone - Lo D GBE- Fingerstyle
    Gold Tone tenor banjolele - Lo F BbDF Fingerstyle
    Luna “Peace” concert - CGDA (5ths) Fingerstyle

    Kala tenor eight string - gGcCEEAA Strum
    Flea "Red" concert - Hi-F BbDG Strum
    Kala "Exotic Mahogany" soprano - Hi-A DF#B Strum

    Mahalo yellow "Smiley" soprano (Dad's Day gift)
    Ka-Lai Pineapple soprano (old) gift

    Old age should rather be feared than death. - Juvenal
    God gave us old age so we wouldn't mind dying so much.

  8. #38
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    Bunnyf, that's the same way I approach music too. At my age, music is for fun and relaxation and not an endless grind of study and practice. I practice things when I think I need it, and I study things that interest me like clawhammer. Anyway that's my view of things.
    Kala "Spalted" baritone - Lo D GBE- Fingerstyle
    Gold Tone tenor banjolele - Lo F BbDF Fingerstyle
    Luna “Peace” concert - CGDA (5ths) Fingerstyle

    Kala tenor eight string - gGcCEEAA Strum
    Flea "Red" concert - Hi-F BbDG Strum
    Kala "Exotic Mahogany" soprano - Hi-A DF#B Strum

    Mahalo yellow "Smiley" soprano (Dad's Day gift)
    Ka-Lai Pineapple soprano (old) gift

    Old age should rather be feared than death. - Juvenal
    God gave us old age so we wouldn't mind dying so much.

  9. #39
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    Aug 2012
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    Staffordshire, UK
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    I've found it best to accept these things and not to worry. I mean it doesn't matter in the great scheme of things. And an Am or C chord usually works just as well. I can't understand music theory, so X fingering = Y chord is fine by me.
    Ukes:

    Soprano: Bruko No 6, Aquila Nylgut concert
    Concert: Fluke, Fremont Black Lines
    Tenor: Ohana TK-35, Fremont Black Lines, Fremont Soloist Low G

    Given away: Makala Dolphin (black)

    Uke'n since April 2012. 2 years on. Still rubbish.

  10. #40
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    Ya know, Pundabaya, even after all that debating, I agree with you completely. When I first started out I just wanted to sing and accompany myself on the Uke, but the musician in me keeps interfering with that plan. I keep jerking myself back to the plan and then drifting into other stuff. Now, I'm studying clawhammer and a bit of finger picking and even pressing myself to learn more chords. It's really difficult for one to be satisfied.
    Kala "Spalted" baritone - Lo D GBE- Fingerstyle
    Gold Tone tenor banjolele - Lo F BbDF Fingerstyle
    Luna “Peace” concert - CGDA (5ths) Fingerstyle

    Kala tenor eight string - gGcCEEAA Strum
    Flea "Red" concert - Hi-F BbDG Strum
    Kala "Exotic Mahogany" soprano - Hi-A DF#B Strum

    Mahalo yellow "Smiley" soprano (Dad's Day gift)
    Ka-Lai Pineapple soprano (old) gift

    Old age should rather be feared than death. - Juvenal
    God gave us old age so we wouldn't mind dying so much.

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